National Governments

Taxonomy Term List

Supporting Moldova to advance their NAP Process

 

Country background, Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Agreement

The Republic of Moldova is a landlocked country with a continental climate, characterised by relatively mild winters with little snowfall, warm summers and low humidity. Favourable farming conditions and a rural population of 60 per cent  indicate that Moldova’s economy is largely dependent on agriculture.  Furthermore, with around 90 per cent of the crop production being rain-fed, the agricultural sector is extremely vulnerable to climate change, which poses risks such as droughts, floods and hail. 

Moldova has effectively responded to the challenges posed by climate change, and under the coordination of their national strategic framework, the Climate Change Adaptation Coordination Mechanism (CCACM), it has already successfully completed the 1st phase of their NAP process (NAP-1), which aimed to ensure the development of systematic capacities to support medium to long-term adaptation planning and budgeting. 

In 2017, on top of completing NAP-1 and turning their efforts to the formulation of NAP-2, Moldova also submitted their Intended NDC to the UNFCCC in 2015, which later became their First NDC, as they ratified the Paris Agreement in June 2017. The NDC includes an Annex containing a comprehensive assessment of the country’s engagement with adaptation planning, including; (1) climate change trends, impacts and vulnerabilities; (2) mid-term adaptation vision, goals and targets; (3) current and planned adaptation undertakings; (4) gaps and barriers; (5) summary of needs; and (6) monitoring and reporting progress. The NDC outlines agriculture, health, water resources, energy, forestry and transport as the most climate-sensitive sectors, also a priority for the NAP process. Moldova is working towards the consideration of climate change adaptation at all levels of planning, which will secure more sustainable development and advance the progress towards the SDGs.

How has the NAP-GSP supported to date?

 

Provided support for the to other adaptation projects

 

 

The "Supporting Moldova’s National Climate Change Adaptation Planning Process" project  is funded by the Austrian Development Cooperation Agency (ADA). The NAP-GSP helped support this project.

 

 

Organised the Eastern European, Caucasus and Central Asia Regional Workshop on the NAP process

 

 
 

In June 2016, the NAP-GSP organised a Regional Workshop, in Chisinau, Moldova. The workshop convened government representatives from across the region to share experiences and knowledge on how best to advance the NAP process.

 

Helped build capacity and  facilitated access to additional climate finance

 

 

Specifically supported with the drafting of the Readiness and Preparatory Support Proposal, outlining finance needs for the second phase of the NAP process (NAP-2), to be submitted to the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The Readiness proposal was submitted to the GCF on 19th August 2016 for review.

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (24.257812488468 42.342305277685)
Funding Source: 
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News and Updates: 

 > Improving meteorological services in Moldova

11 April 2016, Moldova  - This UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Exposure captures how improved meteorological services can provide advanced warning on extreme weather, allowing farmers and communities to further plan ahead and prepare for the exacerbating impacts of climate change

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Timeline: 
Month-Year: 
Jun 2013
Description: 
The first phase of the NAP process (NAP-1) is initiated
Month-Year: 
Sep 2016
Description: 
Moldova submits its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) to the Paris Agreement
Month-Year: 
Sep 2017
Description: 
A survey with line ministries is finalised and identifies further areas in Moldova's adaptation that require support
Month-Year: 
Oct 2017
Description: 
A workshop is held to discuss adaptation priorities
Month-Year: 
Jun 2017
Description: 
Moldova ratifies the Paris Agreement
Month-Year: 
Nov 2017
Description: 
The NAP-1 is completed, with almost all activities in the initial document implemented within an overall budget of US$ 1.2 million
Month-Year: 
2018
Description: 
Two Readiness and Preparatory Support Proposals are being drafted, with support from UNDP and FAO, to request funding from the GCF to support the second phase of the NAP process (NAP-2)

Supporting Montenegro to advance their NAP process

NAP-GSP support to Montenegro:

A support mission was undertaken in 2017 that included sensitisation training, consultations and a stock-taking of existing policies, capacities, institutional arrangements, along with identification of gaps to support adaptation planning. 

The UNDP-led NAP-GSP support also included development of a preliminary roadmap for the NAP process. 

Montenegro is currently developing a funding proposal to access the GCF Readiness Support. 

> More NAP-GSP supported countries

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Project Dates: 
2018

Supporting Indonesia to advance their NAP process

Country background, Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Agreement

Indonesia is an archipelagic country home to approximately 260 million people, the 4th most populous country in the world.  As population grows, so do the impacts of natural hazards, floods and droughts, which are all being intensified by climate change. Furthermore the country is dealing with sea level rise, predicted to affect 42 million people living in low-lying coastal zones. Deforestation and forest degradation is exacerbating the vulnerability of these coastal zones, making nature-based solutions, such as mangrove reforestation, appropriate adaptation strategies.
 
The agricultural, water and fishing industries account for the majority of livelihoods in Indonesia, as well as being those most vulnerable to climate change. Protecting these industries from the accelerating effects of climate change are crucial to Indonesia’s national plans. Although a NAP hasn’t been developed yet, the National Action Plan on Climate Change Adaptation (RAN-API) is the first comprehensive strategy focusing on adaptation. The RAN-API and the NDC Indonesia submitted to the Paris Agreement provide a sturdy framework for the NAP process to build from, and advance the integration of climate change adaptation into Indonesia’s planning and budgeting process, and maintain progress towards achieving the SDGs.
 
 

How has the NAP-GSP supported to date?

 

Conducted a stocktaking exercise

 

 
This exercise was undertaken to identify gaps and needs to advance the NAP process, as well as key areas for adaptation planning through the enhancement of the RAN-API. The stocktaking identified areas where the integration of climate change adaptation into national planning and budgeting processes could be accelerated. Other areas included the improvement of the vulnerability assessment process in adaptation, as well as enhancing tracking and monitoring of adaptation interventions and vulnerability areas. 

 

 

Helped build capacity and  facilitated access to additional climate finance

 
The results of the stocktaking exercise are contributing towards the formulation of a Readiness and Preparatory Support Proposal, being developed by the government with support from UNDP, to be submitted to the Green Climate Fund, for the potential allocation of funds to support adapation planning and the NAP process.
 

 

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> UNDP supporting Indonesia in drive for climate-resilient farming communities

May 2018 - Around the world, the adverse impacts of climate change are being felt keenly by smallholder farmers. The UN Development Programme is now supporting Indonesia – a country in which around 30% of the population is employed in agriculture – to help acutely vulnerable farmers in Nusa Tenggara Timur to adapt. 

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Project Dates: 
2018
Timeline: 
Month-Year: 
Oct 2016
Description: 
Indonesia ratifies the Paris Agreement
Month-Year: 
Nov 2016
Description: 
Indonesia submits their First Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the Paris Agreement, which states the intent to develop a NAP by 2020
Month-Year: 
2017
Description: 
Indonesia requests support from the NAP-GSP, to help advance their NAP process
Month-Year: 
2017
Description: 
A stocktaking exercise takes place to identify gaps and entry points for adaptation planning

Supporting Armenia to advance their NAP process

Country background, Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Agreement

Armenia is a small landlocked country in the Caucasus region with a mostly mountainous terrain, fast flowing rivers and few forests. Its highland continental climate means it is subject to hot summers and cold winters. Agriculture is a core sector in Armenia, employing 44 percent of the working population, although its contribution to the economy is on the decline, with the services and industrial sectors growing instead. Climate change is already affecting Armenia, with an annual mean temperature increase of 1.03 °C and decrease in precipitation of 10 percent recorded during the period 1935 – 2012. Extreme weather events, including heavy rainfall and hailstorms, are increasing in frequency, and desertification and land degradation are set to worsen. Agricultural lands cover 69 percent of the territory and 80 percent of these lands are already being affected by climate change impacts, with decreasing crop yields projected in the future.
 
Although Armenia is in the final stages of transitioning from a semi-presidential system to a parliamentary republic, it has developed an institutional framework that can facilitate the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the goals of the Paris Agreement. The Strategic Program of Prospective Development 2014-2025, the overarching development strategy, mentions the limitations that climate change will pose to economic growth. More specifically, the National Strategy on Disaster Risk Management (2017) integrates climate change and incorporates SDGs. 
 
These policies and strategies take a strong focus on mitigation, however, in Armenia’s INDC, which later became their First NDC, as they ratified the Paris Agreement in 2017, adaptation is given more weight. The NDC prioritises the following sectors as those most vulnerable to climate change and in need of adaptation interventions: natural ecosystems; human health; water resource management; agriculture, including fisheries and forests; energy; human settlements and infrastructure; and tourism. It identifies the foundation of its adaptation strategy to be the application of “an ecosystem-based approach to mitigation and adaptation actions, giving preference to balanced and combined actions”. Another key document, that reflects on the consequences of climate change scenarios, is the Third National Communication to the UNFCCC, submitted in 2015. The Fourth communication will be developed in 2019.
 

How has the NAP-GSP supported to date?

 

Conducted a mission to Armenia

 

Between 7 – 9 December, 2016, the NAP-GSP undertook a preliminary mission to identify Armenia’s strategic priorities regarding the NAP process. Through a stakeholder roundtable, qualitative interviews and extensive desk research, an assessment of relevant initiatives on climate mainstreaming and of the institutional framework and capacities relevant to the NAP process were conducted.

 

Production of a Stocktaking Report

 
Informed by the mission and the consultations with key stakeholders, a Stocktaking Report was produced. The report identified the most pressing weaknesses regarding climate change related risks and adaptation to be: (i) a lack of clear processes for updating risk information and for prioritising adaptation measures; (ii) a lack of awareness and capacity of sector ministries in terms of climate change and adaptation; and (iii) a lack of integration of climate-induced risks and adaptation into planning processes. The Stocktaking Report includes a roadmap for the NAP process to address these gaps.
Helped build capacity and  facilitated access to additional climate finance
 

 

Armenia submitted their Readiness and Preparatory Support Proposal to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) in February 2016, and was one of the first countries to request GCF support for their NAP process. Click for details on the approved project - National Adaptation Plan (NAP) to advance medium and long-term adaptation planning in Armenia.

 

 

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Project Brief / Fact Sheet

National Adaptation Plans in focus: Lessons from Armenia

Location: 
Display Photo: 
Project Dates: 
2018
Timeline: 
Month-Year: 
Sep 2015
Description: 
Armenia submits thier Intend Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) to the Paris Agreement
Month-Year: 
Jun 2016
Description: 
Government delegation from Armenia attends the NAP-GSP Eastern European, Caucasus and Central Asia Regional Workshop, Chisinau, Moldova
Month-Year: 
Dec 2016
Description: 
A stakeholder roundtable is held to identify the strategic priorities for Armenia’s NAP process
Month-Year: 
Dec 2016
Description: 
A Government Decree requests that a Concept of Ecosystem Approach to Climate Change Adaptation, and a NAP, are developed and submitted to government for approval
Month-Year: 
Dec 2016
Description: 
Armenia begins drafting a Readiness proposal to submit to the GCF for potential funding to support the NAP process
Month-Year: 
Feb 2016
Description: 
A Stocktaking Report and a preliminary roadmap for advancing the NAP process in Armenia is developed
Month-Year: 
Feb 2016
Description: 
The Readiness and Preparatory Support Proposal is submitted to the GCF
Month-Year: 
Mar 2017
Description: 
Armenia ratifies the Paris Agreement

Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods

The main objective of the "Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods" programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

The programme targets the three regions in the northern part of Ghana: the Upper East, Upper West and Northern Regions. Compared to other regions of the country, these three northern regions have high degree of exposure to climate variability and change characterized by increasing temperatures and decreasing and erratic rainfall. These factors make the northern regions highly vulnerable to climate change and high priority regions for climate change adaptation.

Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprises the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.2 million (according to Adaptation Fund Website)
Project Details: 

Water is recognized as a cross-cutting resource underlying the National Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy of the Republic of Ghana and the National Water Policy with direct linkages to the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals.

The lack of potable water caused by extreme climate events such as droughts and floods, increases the exposure of people, especially women and children, to water-borne and other hygiene-related diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera. Besides household wellbeing, water plays a central role in many industrial activities. For example, hydropower generation, transportation services, tourism and the agricultural, livestock and fisheries sectors all depend on water resources. Rainwater harvesting serves as the major source of surface water for many rural communities during the rainy season. There is high agreement between national and regional analyses that vulnerability, especially to droughts, has geographical patterns and socioeconomic associations.

The country experienced severe drought in 1983. Since the late 1990s, floods have been increasingly frequent in the northern regions. Floods affected more than 300,000 people in 1999, 630,000 in 2007/08 and 140,000 in 2010, causing deaths, damaging farmlands, and destroying livelihoods. This resulted in severe hunger, which affected the poor and reduced gross domestic product for that year.

The most severe flood occurred in 2007, during which 630,000 people were affected, through losses of life and displacement, and extensive infrastructural damage and loss of crops. This phenomenon demonstrates the potential impact of climate change on Ghana’s development.

Under a changing climate, poor farmers are finding it difficult to predict the timing of rainy seasons. Consequently, it is becoming difficult manage climate risks to crop production. Failure in crop production is one of the key factors undermining food security . The World Food Programme’s (WFP) Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (2009) found that 5% of the population or 1.2 million people are food insecure.

The bulk of the food insecure population is located in the northern regions: 34% in Upper West, 15% in Upper East, and 10% in Northern region. This is the equivalent of approximately 453,000 people. The three northern regions covered by this programme are the most vulnerable. Similarly, the adaptive capacity of these three regions is the lowest nationwide due to low socioeconomic development and the heavy dependence of local economies and livelihoods on rain-fed systems such as agriculture and forestry.

Decreasing annual rainfall and its increasingly erratic pattern, on the background of climate change, are adversely affecting rural livelihoods in northern Ghana and in particular agricultural and pastoral practices. Agriculture is a major driver of Ghana’s economy and employs close to 55 percent of the total labour force.

The proposed Programme will promote four types of adaptation intervention: 1. livelihood enhancement; 2. livelihood diversification; 3. ecosystem protection and enhancement; and 4. community-level water infrastructure planning. These approaches will build up financial, natural, physical and social capital of the communities. A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprise the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010. The main indicator of vulnerability reduction will be changes in access to water and diversification of livelihood activities. Income generation will increase by 30 % in at least 50% of households in the communities.

The main adaptation benefits of the Programme are that it will be able to provide concrete inputs into water resource management planning in the northern region by ensuring that climate change concerns are taken into account. The Programme will be able to build and enhance the adaptive capacity of the ecological systems of water catchments to climate change, once the proposed measures are adopted and implemented.

This is expected to be the first showcase in the Ghana where climate concerns are taken into account and lessons learned will be replicated to other river basins of the country. The activities that will be implemented will include producing knowledge products that capture lessons learnt on management of water resources and diversification of livelihoods under climate change. The capacity to document traditional knowledge systems as well as methods for managing knowledge will be developed, as well as the engagement of community service organizations for knowledge transfer.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The main objective of the programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

There are three components, each with the following outcomes that will be delivered by the programme:

COMPONENT 1: WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLANNING

Outcome 1: Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

COMPONENT 2: COMMUNITY LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION OF WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

Outcome 2: Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

COMPONENT 3: DIVERSIFICATION OF LIVELIHOODS OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Outcome 3: Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Northern Regions urged to embrace climate Adaptation Fund Project
Vibe Ghana

Friday 17 February 2017

The Chiefs and people of the Northern, Upper East and Upper West Regions have been urged to embrace the Adaptation Fund Project to help increase climate resilience and enhance sustainable land and water management in the areas. The Adaptation Fund was established under the Kyoto Protocol of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2001 to finance concrete adaptation projects and programmes in developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. The Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MEST) with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is implementing the project in some selected communities in the north. Mr Asher Nkegbe, the Upper East Regional Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), made the call when the technical team of the Project undertook separates community visits to the beneficiary communities in the Upper East Region to engage them on the project implementation and to solicit for their support in the process.

 

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 -  Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

Outcome 2 - Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

Outcome 3 - Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Project Dates: 
2015 to 2019

Enhancing “whole of islands” Approach to Strengthen Community Resilience to Climate and Disaster risks in Kiribati

The United Nations Development Programme is working with the Government of Kiribati to develop a project proposal for a new US$9 million grant proposal for the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund. The proposed "Enhancing 'whole of islands' Approach to Strengthen Community Resilience to Climate and Disaster Risks in Kiribati" project will include US$45 million in co-financing. The project looks to strengthen the capacity of government institutions to support the operalization of the Kiribati Joint Implementation Plan for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management 2014-2023 (KJIP), enhance capacity of island administrations  to plan for and monitor climate change adaptation processes in a Whole of Islands (WoI) approach, and enhance community capacities  to adapt to climate induced risks to food and water security and community assets.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-160.66406254289 -1.5708480860501)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.9 million proposed GEF LDCF Grant
Co-Financing Total: 
US$45 million proposed co-financing
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes:

1.1 Capacities of national government institutions and personnels strengthened on mainstreaming climate and disaster risks, supporting the operalization of the Kiribati Joint Implementation Plan for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management 2014-2023 (KJIP)

2.1 Capacity of island administrations enhanced to plan for and monitor climate change adaptation processes in a Whole of Islands (WoI) approach

3.1 Community capacities enhanced to adapt to climate induced risks to food and water security and community assets

Expected Outputs:

1.1.1 National and sectoral level policy, planning and legal frameworks revised or developed, integrating climate change and disaster risks

1.1.2 Budgetary processes and related institutional structures adjusted with considerations to climate change risk

1.1.3 National and sectoral monitoring and evaluation (M&E) processes, related data gathering and communication systems enhanced and adjusted to support KJIP implementation

1.1.4 KJIP Coordination mechanism enhanced

1.1.5 Tools and mechanisms to develop, stock, and share data, knowledge, and information on climate change and disaster risks enhanced at the national level

2.2.1 Island and community level vulnerability and adaptation (V&A) assessments revised and/or developed at 5 additional islands

2.1.2 Island Council Strategic Plans reviewed and complemented with whole of island adaptation action plans in 5 islands

2.1.3 Island level M&E processes, related data gathering, and communications systems enhanced and adjusted linked with national systems

2.1.4 Tools and mechanisms to develop, stock, and share data, knowledge, and information on CC and DR enhanced at the island level – with the option of exploring the software and hardware to strengthen information and communication mechanisms for early warning system (EWS)

2.1.5 I Kiribati population in 5 islands receives formal and informal training and awareness raising programmes on climate change and disaster risk management

3.1.1 Climate-resilient agriculture and livestock practices (including supply, production and processing/storage aspects) are introduced in at least 5 additional islands and communities

3.1.2 Water supply and storage facilities enhanced and/or installed at 5 additional islands and communities

3.1.3 Shoreline protection and climate proofing of infrastructure measures implemented at 5 additional islands and communities

Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Capacities of national government institutions and personnels strengthened on mainstreaming climate and disaster risks, supporting the operalization of the Kiribati Joint Implementation Plan for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management 2014-2023 (KJIP).

Outcome 2 - Capacity of island administrations enhanced to plan for and monitor climate change adaptation processes in a Whole of Islands (WoI) approach.

Outcome 3 - Community capacities enhanced to adapt to climate induced risks to food and water security and community assets

Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda

The "Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda" project will support the Government of Uganda in the management of critical wetlands that are being affected by a changing climate. The project will restore wetlands and their eco-system services, based on the wise-use principles and guidelines  outlined by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. It also supports sustainable land management practices and reforestation, resilient agricultural practices and alternative livelihoods for communities living in these areas. This support will reduce the pressures on the wetlands. Finally the project seeks to strengthen the climate information and early warning systems to support these communities to make climate-resilient decisions.

The impact of climate change, coupled with other human and environmental stressors, is increasing degradation of wetlands and their associated ecosystem services in Uganda. This is negatively affecting the livelihoods of the people living in and around the wetlands – around 4,000,000 people. In fact, over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs. Given that wetlands are highly vulnerable to changes in the quantity and quality of their water supply, climate change will most likely substantially alter ecologically important attributes of wetlands and will exacerbate the impacts from human activity. On the other hand, the loss of wetlands could exacerbate the impact of climate change in as they provide fundamental services that contribute to mitigation of such impacts.

 

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (32.695312486957 0.89058628208695)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
800,000 people living in and around the wetlands of Southwestern and Eastern Uganda.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$45 million total, US$24.9 million from Green Climate Fund, US$20.1 million from Government of Uganda and UNDP

ProDocs

GCF Funding Proposal Uganda

Project Details: 

Uganda, wetlands provide many important functions to the people, particularly in the context of food security. This is in addition to its role as a habitat for biodiversity that is also important for the economy. According to a recent 2013 study on the value of wetlands in Uganda, several market and non-market benefits are identified: “The market benefits include water for domestic use and watering of livestock, support to dry season agriculture, provision of handicrafts, building materials, and food resources such as fish, yams, vegetables, wild game, and medicine. The non-market benefits include flood control, purification of water, and maintenance of the water table, microclimate moderation, and storm protection. Wetlands also serve as habitats for important flora and fauna, have aesthetic and heritage values, and contain stocks of biodiversity of potentially high pharmaceutical value. Over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs.” In addition to supporting food and water security, wetlands also support income generation and employment. “Of a total population of 34 million Ugandans, it is estimated that wetlands provide about 320,000 workers with direct employment and provide subsistence employment for over 2.4 million.”

Wetland health and resilience can easily be compromised by climate change impacts. Climate change models for Uganda predict that temperatures will continue to increase, and there will be changes in the seasonal distribution and amount of rainfalls, more frequent extreme weather events, and increases in the frequency of heavy rainfalls. Increases in temperature and erratic rainfall will result in more frequent and intense floods, droughts and heat waves, which will directly threaten wetlands and livelihoods that rely on its healthy ecosystem services. Hydrologic and drainage maps of the project targeted sites (the eastern and southwestern Wetlands Basin) indicate that most of the freshwater inflows pass through the wetlands and natural forests. These systems have played an integral role in maintaining the quality of water over the centuries. However, over the last three decades, climate change impacts, as well as other baseline (non-climate) issues such as excessive sedimentation and non-native species invasions, have resulted in substantial water quality deterioration.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Restoration and management of wetland hydrology and associated forests
Under this sub-component, at least 760 km2 of degraded wetlands and its associated catchment will be restored and the lives of 500,000 people will be improved in selected districts of Eastern and South Western Uganda. The overall aim of the intervention is to restore the ecological and hydrological integrity of the wetland and support the development and implementation of a community-based framework for wetland management plans. This will help support climate risk management and resilient livelihoods through enhanced ecosystems services in the area.

Output 2: Improved agricultural practices and alternative livelihood options in the wetland catchment
This output will target at least 150,000 farmers including those who currently do not have secure access to irrigation, land-poor farmers, women-headed households, and the landless, to build more climate-resilient livelihoods. Investments in small-scale rural infrastructure (shallow bore wells, drip irrigation, tilling tools) for agricultural purposes, especially on-farm water management infrastructure such as dams, canals, drip irrigation systems, as well as farming best practices and crop diversification will be implemented to realize high economic return given their coverage. In addition, the output will focus on technical skills training for employment in key economic sectors viable in wetland areas, such as tourism, health and construction. Most of the beneficiaries have very low levels of education and no skills that can help them find a job. Beneficiaries will be trained in specific skills with high employability potential (e.g. earth mover, driver, assistant nurse, reception clerk in hotels, desktop publishing).Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management

Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management
This output will focus on strengthening access to reliable climate-related information and scaling up advisories for farmers and other target communities in the two wetland target areas, to improve the adaptation capacity of the entire population in and around the wetlands – around 1 million people. This will include the expansion of networks that generate and process climate-related data into relevant information to the scale and location of local districts, villages or communities, as well as dissemination of climate-related information/services, advisories and early warnings to communities. A strong focus of this output will be on delivering actionable climate-related information to communities, taking the form of agro-met advisories for agriculture, as well as the dissemination channels for making information available to the “last mile.”

Contacts: 
UNDP
Benjamin Larroquette
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
Green Climate Fund
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Funding Proposal approved by Green Climate Fund Board: 30 June 2016
Funded Activity Agreement (FAA) effectiveness reached: 6 July 2017
Project Document signature between UNDP and Government: 7 July 2017
Project financing agreement signed between UNDP and Government: 23 August 2017
Request from UNDP to GCF to release funding: 13 October 2017
Inception Workshop - Begin Project Implementation: 29 November 2017

 

 

 

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In the News

Government of Uganda and UNDP launch implementation of a $44.26 million project to restore wetlands and build community resilience

The Government of Uganda and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have kick-started a new project on "building community resilience, wetlands ecosystems and associated catchments in Uganda." The new project, which is Uganda’s first Green Climate Fund-financed initiative, is a response to the Presidential Initiative on Wetlands. The project inception meeting held on 29 November 2017 marks the start of project implementation and comes after both entities signed a financing agreement in August 2017 for the project, which is intended to restore degraded wetlands, improve ecosystems, and strengthen climate information and early warning systems. The grant based project will target an estimated 4 million people who live in and around Uganda’s wetlands and rely on them for food security. It is part of both the Government Uganda and United Nations efforts to promote Sustainable Development Goal 13 on climate action as well as fulfil its obligations to the Paris Agreement on Climate Change which it ratified last year. “Fighting climate change and its effects is now a key goal for the Government of Uganda. We are delighted that this project is going to enable us to respond to the President’s call to protect wetlands and boost our ongoing efforts in climate change mitigation and adaptation,” Hon. Mary Goretti Kitutu, the State Minister Environment, said at the inception workshop for the project.

 

Uganda, UNDP Sign Landmark Financing Agreement to Restore Wetlands

Chimp Reports
25 August 2017

The Government of Uganda and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have today August 23 signed a financing agreement for the Green Climate Fund (GCF) project to restore degraded wetlands, improve ecosystems, strengthen climate information and early warning systems. Hon. Matia Kasaija, the Finance Minister signed on behalf of the Government and Ms. Rosa Malango, the UNDP Resident Representative and UN Resident Coordinator for Uganda signed on behalf of UNDP.

 

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About (Summary): 
The Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda project will support the Government of Uganda in the management of critical wetlands that are being affected by a changing climate. The project will restore wetlands and their eco-system services, based on the wise-use principles and guidelines outlined by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. It also supports sustainable land management practices and reforestation, resilient agricultural practices and alternative livelihoods for communities living in these areas. This support will reduce the pressures on the wetlands. Finally the project seeks to strengthen the climate information and early warning systems to support these communities to make climate-resilient decisions. The impact of climate change, coupled with other human and environmental stressors, is increasing degradation of wetlands and their associated ecosystem services in Uganda. This is negatively affecting the livelihoods of the people living in and around the wetlands – around 4,000,000 people. In fact, over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs. Given that wetlands are highly vulnerable to changes in the quantity and quality of their water supply, climate change will most likely substantially alter ecologically important attributes of wetlands and will exacerbate the impacts from human activity. On the other hand, the loss of wetlands could exacerbate the impact of climate change in as they provide fundamental services that contribute to mitigation of such impacts.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

 

Output 1: Restoration and management of wetland hydrology and associated forests 

 

Output 2: Improved agricultural practices and alternative livelihood options in the wetland catchment

 

Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management

 

 

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2025

Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience of the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa

As a Small Island Developing State in the Pacific, Samoa has been heavily impacted by increasing severe tropical storms. In response, the Government of Samoa has adopted a programmatic approach to address the issue of climate change-induced flooding .
 
As part of this programme, the Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience of the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa project will enable the Government to reduce the impact of recurrent flood-related impacts in the Vaisigano river catchment. The river flows through the Apia Urban Area (AUA), Samoa’s primary urban economic area.
 
The primary direct beneficiaries include approximately 26,528 people in the Vaisigano river catchment who will benefit from upgraded infrastructure and drainage downstream, integrated planning and capacity strengthening, including planning for flooding caused by extreme weather events, and flood mitigation measures especially riverworks and ecosystems solutions in the Vaisigano River Catchment. Overall, 37,000 people will also benefit indirectly. The economic net present value of the proposed investment project has been estimated to reach approximately US$15.6 million, and to yield an economic internal rate of return of approximately 15.5%. The project is expected to run from 2017-2023.
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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-168.57421877011 -13.228535498555)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
26,528 people living in the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$65.7 million total. US$57.7 million from Green Climate Fund, US$8 million from Government of Samoa (as detailed in the ProDoc, Dec 2016)

Funded Activity Agreement - Samoa

ProDocs

GCF Funding Proposal

Project Details: 

GCF resources will be used to implement a combination of integrated watershed and flood management works including both hard and soft measures. This includes upgrading river works to cater to increased water flows during flood events (taking into account the likelihood of the increased frequency of extreme events), ensuring that infrastructure works, and home dwellings, government and private-sector buildings are made more secure and provide adequate shelter in case of floods and their aftermaths. Additionally, the project will ensure that when floodwaters occur, the excess waters are channeled away through an effective, efficient, and fit-for-purpose drainage system. The project will consequently play a critical role in assisting the urban population and economy to effectively manage the inevitable increased intensity and frequency of flooding.

Direct benefits from these interventions include reduced risk of damage to public and private infrastructure/assets; reduced possibility of loss of life; and enhanced land value in flood-prone areas. Indirect benefits include reduced losses in income/sales; reduced costs of clean-ups, maintenance and repairs; reduced costs of relief and response efforts; and reduced possibility of health hazards. In addition to these 26,000 direct beneficiaries, the general population of Samoa will benefit from the safeguarding of critical economic assets and learning that will be generated.

In addition, mid and upstream ecosystem and community-based adaptation measures will enhance capture, infiltration, storage and delayed release of rainwater in soils and biomass, and water retention ponds will serve both climate-smart agribusiness development and combat degradation of vulnerable ecosystems through appropriate agro-forestry land-use practices.

Addressing Climate Change in Samoa

Recent extreme events have resulted in approximately US$200 million worth of damages during each event. Climate projections for Samoa suggest that the risk of climate induced events will increase, potentially undermining development progress in urban Apia where the majority of the population and economic activity is located.

Given the topography of the country, extreme events result in significant river discharge that results in flooding of lowland areas. Recent tropical events such as Cyclone Evan have caused significant damage to both public and private assets as a result of flooding, resulting in serious health impacts. Urban infrastructure has suffered considerably from the recurrence of flooding and is unable to cope as climate change-related events are expected to become more frequent and intense.

Projected climate change scenarios cited by the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) suggest that Samoa is expected to have more frequent and extreme rainfall events; more frequent and longer drought events; increased air and water temperatures; sea level rise; and more frequent extreme wind events.

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project represents the Government of Samoa’s initial steps in operationalizing a comprehensive flood management solution for the likely consequences of extreme events in Apia, the capital with about 80,000 people. In this project, three interlinked project outputs will be pursued:

  • Capacities and information base strengthened for the Government of Samoa to pursue an integrated approach to reduce vulnerability towards flood-related risks;
  • Key infrastructure in the Vaisigano River Catchment are flood-proofed to increase resilience to negative effects of excessive water; and
  • Upgraded drainage in downstream areas to increase capacity and allow for more rapid outflow of flood waters.
Monitoring & Evaluation: 


Contacts: 
UNDP
Reis Lopez Rello
Regional Technical Specialist - Adaptation
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
gcf
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


News and Updates: 

Funding Proposal approved by Green Climate Fund Board: 14 December 2016
Funded Activity Agreement (FAA) effectiveness reached: 11 July 2017
Local Project Appraisal Committee meeting (LPAC): 4 July 2017
Project Document signature between UNDP and Government: 21 July 2017

First disbursement of funds: August 2017

'Samoa kicks off climate adaptation project to benefit 1 in 3 citizens facing flood risk' UNDP, October 25, 2017. In the lead up to COP climate talks in Bonn, the launch of a Green Climate Fund-financed US$65 million project signals strong global support for climate-resilient development in Small Island Developing States. 

'Green Climate Fund Samoa project launch and inception workshop' - UNDP Samoa, August 21, 2017. The Government of Samoa, through the Ministry of Finance, and the United Nations Development Program held joint events for the GCF-funded project, 'Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience for the Vaisigano River Catchment' . The workshop presented the work plan for the project and prioritized activities ahead.
 

'Every dollar counts in fight against climate change - New GCF Funding for Samoa' - Samoa Observer, December 16, 2016. Op-ed celebrating Somoa's recently approved US$58 million Green Climate Fund project.

'Director General hails meeting outcome' -  Samoa Observer, December 15, 2016. The Director General of the Vailima-based Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (S.P.R.E.P), Leota Kosi Latu, has hailed the outcome of Green Climate Fund Board meeting in Apia. With three multi-million projects proposed by Pacific...
 
 

YouTube

 

Learn more about the climate challenges facing Samoa, and how UNDP is working to address those challenges and reduce risks.

Information in French / Informations en français: 


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Subtitle: 
Flood Management in Samoa
About (Summary): 
As a Small Island Developing State (SIDS) in the Pacific, Samoa has been heavily impacted by increasing severe tropical storms. In response, the Government of Samoa has adopted a programmatic approach to address the issue of climate change induced flooding in Samoa. As part of this programme, the Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience of the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa project will enable the Government of Samoa to reduce the impact of recurrent flood-related impacts in the Vaisigano river catchment. The river flows through the Apia Urban Area (AUA), Somoa’s primary urban economic area.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1. Strengthening capacities and mechanisms for integrated approach to reduce flood-related risks in place.

 

Output 2. Key infrastructure in the Vaisigano River Catchment are flood-proofed to increase resilience to negative effects of excessive water.

 
 
Output 3. Drainage in downstream areas upgraded for increased regulation of water flows.
 

 

Civil Society Engagement: 


Solomon Islands Water Sector Adaptation (SIWSAP)

The impacts of climate change, particularly sea-level rise (SLR) and pronounced droughts have severe consequences on water and sanitation in the country. The areas which are most vulnerable to SLR are low-lying islands, atolls and flat deltaic regions at the mouth of larger rivers. Intrusion of salt water from rise in sea level has affected groundwater resources, especially freshwater aquifers (lens) in small atolls and low-lying islands that rely on rainfall or groundwater for their freshwater supply. Droughts have severely affected water supplies and have also damaged crops and livelihoods. Likewise, climate-related impacts on the quality and quantity of water has a gender dimension; in the context of the ethnic tensions, the safety and security of women and girls are compromised as they need to travel further to collect water, also leading to less time for other activities.

To improve the resilience of water resources to the impacts of climate change in order to improve health, sanitation and quality of  life, and sustain livelihoods in targeted vulnerable areas.  The project will focus on issues of water supply and sanitation.

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects, click here.

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (159.697262571 -8.98782221794)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural and township communities of the Solomon Islands in 6 provinces: Gizo, Taro, Tingoa, Ferafalu, Tuwo, and Santa Catalina.
Funding Source: 

ProDocs

Solomon Island LDCF Project Document

PIFs

Solomon Islands PIF 4568 (May 2012)

Financing Amount: 
$6,850,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$40,255,000
Project Details: 

Based on the LDCF resources requested and the scope of the climate change adaptation measures, the project will cover work in 6 pilot sites. On a national scale there are a number of benefits that this project will contribute to.

  • More than 70% of the national population i.e. more than 360,000 people benefit from communal water systems and natural water sources and do not rely on government managed water supply systems. Many of these supply systems are dependent on water catchments and underground aquifers aquifers that are very sensitive to the hydrological cycle and its disturbances, most of which are related to climate change. Lessons from the project could be multiplied for the benefit of this population.
  • Improvements to water supply will also result in more people having access to proper sanitation facilities, potentially reduce prevalence of disease and reduced costs to the people and to government’s social services
  • UNDP estimates that water supply investment has an economic return of $4.4 to $1 while investment in sanitation has a return of $9.1 to $1. Some of the multiplier effects of investing in water and sanitation include; healthy workers, savings on medicines, bottled water not required, boost to agriculture and healthy tourists
  • Increasing preparedness and enhancing resilience of the water sector to extreme events can potentially reduce the cost to government for disaster relief. Over the past few years flooding, king tides, excessive rainfall and storm surges have rendered rural locations and communities as disaster areas with the frequency of calls for disaster relief assistance from the national government reaching levels never before experienced in the country since it attained political independence in 1978
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Integrate water conservation and sustainable water resources management in all sectors and communities.

The outputs include: construction of village/community water tanks; construction of water reservoirs for institutional and residential areas; upgrading of existing reservoirs, protective structures/access roads; promote/build household rainwater harvesting; construction of strategic storage water reserve tank; engineered or “climate proofed” water reservoirs; develop and implement Water Use efficiency Plan; raise awareness for water conservation.

Outcome 2: Incorporate climate change adaptation strategies into the guidelines and criteria for design and construction of appropriate water infrastructure in vulnerable areas.

The outputs include: guidelines for development of water supply in rural areas developed; inventory of POPs and adequate storage and leakage prevention conducted; good practice guidance for pesticide storage and use, and application developed and used; drought and its effect on water distribution in rural areas assessed; rainwater harvesting technologies developed and used.

Outcome 3: Increased reliability and quality of water supply to all sectors and communities

The outputs include: capacity of water supply increased; water reticulation and distribution systems improved and where necessary constructed; arable land improved and rehabilitated; sustainable use of water on commercial agriculture land; build appropriate low-technology irrigation system for farmers; diversification food crops with a focus on high-yielding crop varieties promoted; promote water conservation and water use efficiency; prevent land-based pollution.

Outcome 4: Enhanced institutional and legal framework for water resources management

The outputs include: individual and institutional capacity for sustainable water management built and/or enhanced; water resources sector policy developed and implemented; water resources sector legislation developed and adopted; water sector plans and programmes developed and implemented.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Patrick Rose
CO Focal Point
Ministry of Mines Energy and Rural Electrification
Rance Sore
Project Director
UNDP
Jose Padilla
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: 
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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Championed by the Government of the Solomon Islands through the Ministry of Mines, Energy and Rural Electrification (MMERE) Water Resources Division (WRD) in partnership with Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology (MECDM), and other line ministries, SIWSAP activities are designed to ensure access to safe and affordable drinking water and increase reliability and quality of water supplies in targeted areas. Longer-term project measures are working to integrate climate-resilient water management in policy and development frameworks; encourage investments in cost-effective and adaptive water management technologies; and improve governance and knowledge management for climate change adaptation in the water sector at the local and national levels.

Project Dates: 
2014 to 2019