NAP-GSP Resources

This country briefing on the process to formulate and implement National Adaptation Plans in Bosnia and Herzegovina considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting NAPs is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in the NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the process to formulate and implement NAPs in Bosnia and Herzegovina . Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This country briefing on the process to formulate and implement National Adaptation Plans in Haiti considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting NAPs is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in Haiti's NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the process to formulate and implement NAPs in Haiti. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This country briefing on the process to formulate and implement National Adaptation Plans in Benin considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting NAPs is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in Benin's NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the process to formulate and implement NAPs in Benin. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This country briefing on the process to formulate and implement National Adaptation Plans in Egypt considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting NAPs is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in Egypt's INDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the process to formulate and implement NAPs in Egypt. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This country briefing on the process to formulate and implement National Adaptation Plans in Liberia considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in the country's INDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the process to formulate and implement NAPs in Liberia. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

In the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process, Least Developed Country (LDC) Parties have obligations to deliver (albeit with some flexibility) alongside all other Parties. These include fulfilling reporting requirements and having to communicate forward-looking plans to address climate change in their countries, among other tasks. Taking into account their specific needs and special situations, provisions for support have been (and continue to be) adopted for LDCs to help them undertake these commitments. This toolkit is a collection of short briefs on the ways LDC Parties engage in the UNFCCC process and which provisions adopted to date help them undertake their work.

Increasing evidence of the differential impacts of climate change on women and girls in recent decades has led to significant progress in addressing the interlinkages between gender and climate change under the UNFCCC. The two-year Lima Work Programme on Gender launched at COP20 aimed to advance gender equality mandates across all areas of the climate negotiations. It is due to be reviewed at COP22 in Marrakech in November 2016, presenting an opportunity for parties and observers to further strengthen and advance gender equality under the UNFCCC. Women and girls in the countries represented by the Least Developed Countries (LDC) Group are disproportionately dependent on climate-sensitive resources for their livelihoods and have unequal access to land, water and other resources and productive assets.

The Least Developed Counties (LDCs) have worked with the two branches of the UNFCCC’s Technology Mechanism — the Technology Executive Committee (TEC) and the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN) — for several years. This paper presents information the LDC Group representatives on the TEC and CTCN Advisory Board have gathered on how LDCs are currently using technology initiativesm and programmes. It aims to better understand the barriers and challenges LDCs face in implementing technology development and transfer and explores what changes to existing technology and financial institutions could lessen these barriers and challenges. 

Madagascar launched its National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process in 2012 aiming to reduce climate vulnerability in the medium- and long term, and to integrate climate-related risks and opportunities into development planning and budgeting systems. Upon request from the Government of Madagascar, UNDP and the Global Water Partnership (GWP) under the umbrella of the NAP-GSP conducted a stocktaking mission and training on the NAP process. This Stocktaking Report covers institutional mechanisms, stakeholder mapping, an analysis of climate change initiatives, recommendations for strategic intervention areas and a NAP roadmap.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the Government of Liberia (GOL) requested support from UNDP to help identify entry points and a plan to institutionalise their National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process. In response, the UNDP-led Global Support Programme on NAPs (NAP-GSP), financed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF), agreed to support the Government to facilitate the start up of the process and conduct a stocktaking of Liberia’s relevant NAP activities. This Stocktaking Report covers an overview Liberia's climate change vulnerability and of the NAP process, outlines the relevant processes, actors and entry points, reviews Liberia's Climate Change Strategic Plan and Climate Change Action Plan, provides recommendations for strategic intervention areas and a NAP roadmap.

In 2014, the Union of the Comoros launched its NAP process with the aim to reduce climate vulnerability in the medium- to long-term and to integrate climate-related risks and opportunities into existing development planning and budgeting systems. At the request of the government of Comoros, the joint UNDP-UN Environment National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) conducted a stocktaking of NAP activities. This Stocktaking Report covers an overview of the NAP process, an analysis of NAP-relevent processes and actors in the Comoros, a review of Comoros's Climate Change Action Plan, recommendations for the NAP process in Comoros, strategic areas of intervention, and a NAP roadmap.

In response to Cambodia’s efforts to integrate climate change into planning, the joint UNDP/UN Environment National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) together with Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) agreed to support the Royal Government of Cambodia to conduct a stocktaking of National Adaptation Plan (NAP) activities. This Stocktaking Report covers an overview of the NAP processs in Cambodia, reviews Cambodia's Climate Change Action Plan, offers recommendations for the NAP process, suggests strategic intervention areas and provides a NAP Roadmap

This Stocktaking Report for the NAP process in Niger was made possible through the support and guidance of Kamayé Maâzou, Gousmane Moussa and the team of the Climate Change Unit of the National Council on Environment for Sustainable Development of Niger. It covers the national context for the NAP and contains an overview capacity assessment for the NAP.

This Stocktaking Report for the NAP process in Senegal was drafted based on the results of the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) training workshop in July 2015, complemented by a desk review. The report covers policy and planning entry points for the NAP, institutional mechanisms and stakeholder mapping, existing CCA and initiatives of relevence to the NAP, status of climate change integration, a SWOT analysist for the NAP, and a summary of challenges, barriers and gaps for the NAP.

This guide provides practical information to help prepare various reports and communications under the UNFCCC as well as take part in the relevant review processes. It also provides a glimpse into the on going negotiations to develop the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement and some of the implications for those preparing reports and communications for their countries.

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Bangladesh considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the Bangladesh NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This publication gives an outline of the joint  UNDP and UN Environment National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP).
 
The joint UNDP-UN Environment National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) was launched in June 2013, following a decision at COP 17 in Durban, requesting UN organisations to support the National Adaptation Plan process. The programme is financed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF), and the Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF). 
 
The NAP-GSP, together with partners, is assisting developing countries to identify technical, institutional and financial needs to integrate climate change adaptation into medium and long-term national planning and financing. Activities under the NAP-GSP target decision-makers from Environment, Planning and Finance Ministries, at the state and local level. The NAP-GSP provides technical expertise and guidance on country NAP processes, and provides opportunities for knowledge exchange on NAPs.

 

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Uruguay considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the Uruguay NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Niger considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the Niger NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed. This briefing is also available in French.

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Papua New Guinea (PNG) considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the PNG NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Morocco considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains an outline of activities carried out to advance the Moroccan NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Bhutan considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the Bhutan NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Armenia considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the Armenian NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed.

This Regional Briefing on Asia- Pacific National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) aims to provide a brief overview of the NAP experiences of middle-income countries in the Asia and Pacific region (excluding Central Asia), and highlight emerging issues, challenges and opportunities.

This regional briefing on NAPs for the Caribbean aims to provide a brief overview of the NAP experiences of Caribbean countries, and highlight emerging issues, challenges and opportunities. 

This briefing aims to provide a brief overview of NAP experiences in African developing countries, highlighting emerging issues, challenges and opportunities.

Attending UN climate negotiations for the first time is daunting, especially if it is a Conference of the Parties (COP) session. With so many meetings happening in parallel and using unfamiliar jargon and acronyms, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process is notoriously complex. This toolkit will help new delegates, in particular from the Least Developed Countries, navigate the session. It focuses on the process, rather than the content of negotiations, and offers some practical tips for getting through the days (and nights).
Language is a powerful thing. In multilateral agreements, the choice of words is always strategic and purposeful. Particularly in the context of the climate change negotiations, the great amount of acronyms, buzzwords and legal terms can be complex, overwhelming and misleading too. This pocket book aims to be a supporting tool for a better understanding and application of the language in the UNFCCC negotiations

The Least Developed Countries (LDCs) represent 48 of the 197 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Not only are they the world’s poorest economies, they are extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Since 2001, they have acted together as the LDC Group in UNFCCC negotiations. But as well as providing assistance, this has aggregated individual country experiences, opinions and interests, creating challenges, particularly when trying to remedy individual countries’ struggles to participate, monitor and implement decisions back home. This paper aims to address this disconnect by analysing LDC feedback on how they prepare, analyse, report and disseminate information on the UNFCCC negotiations.

At the end of 2015, the 196 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) gathered in Paris for the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties (COP21). On 12 December, they adopted the Paris Agreement, contained in Decision 1/CP.21. Marking the successful end to negotiations that started at COP17 in Durban four years earlier, the agreement is an important milestone for the poorest members of the international community. This paper provides an analysis of the Paris Agreement and the relevant sections of Decision 1/CP.21 that give effect to the agreement, based on the positions of the 48 Least Developed Countries.

 
By: Achala Abeysinghe, Caroline Prolo
There are various legal options for the form of the final outcome from the COP21 to be held in Paris that comes under the three broad options listed in the Durban Decision.

The impacts of climate change increasingly threaten communities around the world, particularly in Least Developed Countries (LDCs). National adaptation plans (NAPs) allow developing countries to identify their adaptation needs; develop and implement strategies and programmes to address those needs; and enable actions to protect vulnerable communities. But developing a NAP is not always straightforward. This paper considers the benefits and challenges of implementing a national mandate to provide the impetus to develop a NAP, assign responsibilities and encourage cross-sectoral participation, exploring the legal forms such a mandate could take and sharing experiences from LDCs undergoing the NAP p

Evaluation report of the first training in July 2015 in Bangkok, Thailand, held to strengthen the ‘emerging’ negotiators’ understanding of the mechanics of the negotiating process within the UNFCCC, and to help them effectively support their delegation on the main issues. The training focused on specific negotiation skills and ways in which these skills can best be used to further the national objectives as well as those of the wider LDC negotiating group in the context of climate change negotiations.

This seminar was designed and delivered by UNITAR as part of a broader UNDP / UN Environment global programme to build the capacity of Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to participate effectively, both individually and as a group, in intergovernmental climate change processes. 
Two Years On: Progress and Lessons Learned from the National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP GSP)

This is the first of several training programmes to be delivered over the course of 2015 and 2016 to build the capacity of LDCs to effectively participate in intergovernmental climate change processes.

With mounting scientific evidence of the impacts of climate change and as public awareness of climate change has increased, more sophisticated capacity development approaches are being embraced. These can make better sense of the complex mix of institutional measures needed for adaptation planning to be successful backed by well-tailored and recurrent skills development.
 
This skills assessment framework is derived from experience acquired during a joint UNDP-UNITAR Global Water Partnership mission carried out in Niger in May 2014, under the NAP-GSP.
In response to the need for NAP support and capacity building, a NAP country-level training has been developed. This new training aims to provide a general understanding of the conceptual approach of NAPs and the NAP technical guidelines, produced by the Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG). This factsheet outlines the NAP Country Level Training, which aims to develop capacity for multi-sectoral involvement in the NAP process.

NAP-GSP e-news for December 2014 - sent to over 2,500 recipients, stakeholders, partners, organisations and colleagues.

Minutes of the NAP-GSP coordination meeting - attended by programme partners at COP19 on 15 November 2013.

Water, Climate and Development Programme for Africa - Support to National Adaptation Planning Processes

 

The National Development Plan of Uganda aims to address structural bottlenecks in the economy to accelerate socioeconomic transformation and bring a portion of the third of the population out of poverty.  The plan outlines the development priorities and implementation strategies to help achieve this. Among these, climate change is acknowledged as an enabling sector that will require integration with other sectors of the economy for successful socioeconomic transformation.

In an effort to develop a climate change abatement economy, Sierra Leone’s main focus is to earn forest carbon credits through the implementation of REDD/REDD+ programmes. The government aims to develop and manage 2.5 million hectares of forests in the next decade to assist income-generating activities of non-timber forest products, sustainable tree crops and ecotourism. They plan to achieve this through participatory forest management in all forested districts and communities. 

This study gives an overview of the current strengths, weaknesses, gaps and duplications in the legislative and institutional framework in the context of disaster risk reduction in Armenia. It details out the present structure and status of implementation of the various activities under this programme and has also enabled the availability of a strong disaster management database in the country. 

 

The National Climate Change Strategy’s key objective is to improve the identification and assessment of climate change impacts, with a focus on development, infrastructure and economic security. The country has already been proactively undertaking response measures through the implementation of the National Strategy for Social and Economic Development until 2030. 

The National Climate Change Policy recognizes climate change as a sustainable development issue that brings opportunities as well as challenges. Building upon this idea, the government through this policy aims to enhance the country’s adaptive capacity while pursuing a path of low-carbon development. Based on 9 guiding principles, the climate change response actions have been grouped under 10 categories covering finance, technology, vulnerability and adaptation, mitigation among others. 

 

The Bangladeshi government acknowledges the likely impact of climate change on the country, which is expected to be significantly high. Consequently, the Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan (BCCSAP) is to be treated as a “living document” which will be constantly revised as likely impacts and best responses are better understood. The strategy encompasses actions under 6 broad categories with emphasis on sustainable development, poverty reduction and increased well being of all vulnerable groups with a special focus on gender sensitivity.

Classified by the UNFPA as one of the most vulnerable nations to natural hazards along with Solomon Islands in the South Pacific, Vanuatu faces the challenge of eradicating widespread poverty in the face of climate change.  

 

Tuvalu faces acute impacts of climate change on account of being an extremely low-lying small island country with limited ecological, socio-economic and technological capacities. As a result, major threats posed by climate change include sea level rise, costal erosion, storm surges and salt-water inundation among others. The climate change policy thus aims to integrate disaster risk management and adaptation actions to formulate a comprehensive and effective response.

 

With direct links to the National Strategy for Sustainable Development and the National Climate Change Policy, the Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management policy has been developed by equally prioritizing adaptation, mitigation and disaster management actions. The policy consists of 7 thematic goals that aid the process of sustainable development in the country. 

Like many LDCs, Rwanda is heavily reliant on rain-fed agriculture, which is the largest employer and also contributes 35% to its GDP. Coupled with the fact that it depends on hydropower for half of its electricity needs, Rwanda is currently extremely vulnerable to climate change. The country has already experienced temperature increase higher than the global average and is projected to continue to rise up to 2.5°C by the 2050s from 1970 levels.

 

Ranked as the fourth most vulnerable country, the government of Nepal has adopted the approach of community-based policies to respond to climate change. This document reviews the country’s legal framework and the local communities’ rights related to climate change. In particular, it looks at key aspects and gaps of the three extant policies – the National Adaptation Programme of Action, the Local Adaptation Plan of Action and the REDD Preparedness Plan.

 

Located in Western Africa, Mali has a dry tropical climate that has witnessed an increased frequency of squalls and a decrease in rainfall quantity. With approximately 80% of the working population dependent on climate sensitive sectors of agriculture, livestock and fisheries, adaptation based initiatives form key part of the climate response strategy. Consequently the Malian government aims to integrate the national climate change policy with the framework for social and economic development.

The National Strategic Development Plan extends from 2012-13 to 2016-17 and serves as an implementation strategy for the country's National Vision 2020. The plan recognizes vulnerability to climate change as one of the 7 key challenges faced by the country and consequently strategizes a number of actions including biodiversity conservation and integrated land and water resource management as ways of combating it. 

 

Ethiopia aims to achieve the status of a middle income, carbon-neutral country by 2025. This document gives a brief overview of the strategies behind this plan centered around four key actions – increasing food yield, protecting and reestablishing forests as carbon stocks, expanding renewable energy generation and leapfrogging to energy efficient technologies in transport and industries. 

Vision Burundi is a synthesis report based on the conclusions of forward-looking national studies “Burundi-2025” started in 2003. The document looks at 8 pillars of development and recommends policies and strategies from the viewpoint of sustainable development. Currently the economy of Burundi is largely agrarian, dependent on the vagaries of the climate. Cognizant of this, the government aims to build environmental policies focusing on adaptation strategies and renewable energy technology. 

The objective of the NAPA project for Vanuatu was to develop a country-wide programme of immediate and urgent project-based adaptation activities in priority sectors, in order to address the current and anticipated adverse effects of climate change, including extreme events.

Samoa, like other Least Developed Countries (LDCs) inherits high vulnerability to natural disasters and to external economic and trade developments for which it has no control. These natural disasters include tropical cyclones, prolonged periods of drought, extreme flooding, pests and sudden outbreak of diseases, storm surges and sea level rise.

With Tuvalu's limited natural resource base, widely scattered and sparsely populated islands which rarely exceed 3 meters above mean sea level, a small domestic market with little potential for economies of scale, isolation from international markets, and smallness in geographical size shows Tuvalu is highly vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change, extreme weather events, and sea level rise.

Climate change and global warming are significant challenges that the world, particularly the developing and least developed countries, face this century. Although LDCs like Bhutan contribute the least to global warming, they will nonetheless be seriously affected by the impacts of climate change. The NAPA addresses the most severe climate induced threats faced by Bhutan, while outlining approaches for comphrensive adaptation and mitigation.