Water Resources

Taxonomy Term List

Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods

The main objective of the "Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods" programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

The programme targets the three regions in the northern part of Ghana: the Upper East, Upper West and Northern Regions. Compared to other regions of the country, these three northern regions have high degree of exposure to climate variability and change characterized by increasing temperatures and decreasing and erratic rainfall. These factors make the northern regions highly vulnerable to climate change and high priority regions for climate change adaptation.

Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprises the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.2 million (according to Adaptation Fund Website)
Project Details: 

Water is recognized as a cross-cutting resource underlying the National Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy of the Republic of Ghana and the National Water Policy with direct linkages to the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals.

The lack of potable water caused by extreme climate events such as droughts and floods, increases the exposure of people, especially women and children, to water-borne and other hygiene-related diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera. Besides household wellbeing, water plays a central role in many industrial activities. For example, hydropower generation, transportation services, tourism and the agricultural, livestock and fisheries sectors all depend on water resources. Rainwater harvesting serves as the major source of surface water for many rural communities during the rainy season. There is high agreement between national and regional analyses that vulnerability, especially to droughts, has geographical patterns and socioeconomic associations.

The country experienced severe drought in 1983. Since the late 1990s, floods have been increasingly frequent in the northern regions. Floods affected more than 300,000 people in 1999, 630,000 in 2007/08 and 140,000 in 2010, causing deaths, damaging farmlands, and destroying livelihoods. This resulted in severe hunger, which affected the poor and reduced gross domestic product for that year.

The most severe flood occurred in 2007, during which 630,000 people were affected, through losses of life and displacement, and extensive infrastructural damage and loss of crops. This phenomenon demonstrates the potential impact of climate change on Ghana’s development.

Under a changing climate, poor farmers are finding it difficult to predict the timing of rainy seasons. Consequently, it is becoming difficult manage climate risks to crop production. Failure in crop production is one of the key factors undermining food security . The World Food Programme’s (WFP) Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (2009) found that 5% of the population or 1.2 million people are food insecure.

The bulk of the food insecure population is located in the northern regions: 34% in Upper West, 15% in Upper East, and 10% in Northern region. This is the equivalent of approximately 453,000 people. The three northern regions covered by this programme are the most vulnerable. Similarly, the adaptive capacity of these three regions is the lowest nationwide due to low socioeconomic development and the heavy dependence of local economies and livelihoods on rain-fed systems such as agriculture and forestry.

Decreasing annual rainfall and its increasingly erratic pattern, on the background of climate change, are adversely affecting rural livelihoods in northern Ghana and in particular agricultural and pastoral practices. Agriculture is a major driver of Ghana’s economy and employs close to 55 percent of the total labour force.

The proposed Programme will promote four types of adaptation intervention: 1. livelihood enhancement; 2. livelihood diversification; 3. ecosystem protection and enhancement; and 4. community-level water infrastructure planning. These approaches will build up financial, natural, physical and social capital of the communities. A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprise the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010. The main indicator of vulnerability reduction will be changes in access to water and diversification of livelihood activities. Income generation will increase by 30 % in at least 50% of households in the communities.

The main adaptation benefits of the Programme are that it will be able to provide concrete inputs into water resource management planning in the northern region by ensuring that climate change concerns are taken into account. The Programme will be able to build and enhance the adaptive capacity of the ecological systems of water catchments to climate change, once the proposed measures are adopted and implemented.

This is expected to be the first showcase in the Ghana where climate concerns are taken into account and lessons learned will be replicated to other river basins of the country. The activities that will be implemented will include producing knowledge products that capture lessons learnt on management of water resources and diversification of livelihoods under climate change. The capacity to document traditional knowledge systems as well as methods for managing knowledge will be developed, as well as the engagement of community service organizations for knowledge transfer.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The main objective of the programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

There are three components, each with the following outcomes that will be delivered by the programme:

COMPONENT 1: WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLANNING

Outcome 1: Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

COMPONENT 2: COMMUNITY LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION OF WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

Outcome 2: Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

COMPONENT 3: DIVERSIFICATION OF LIVELIHOODS OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Outcome 3: Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Northern Regions urged to embrace climate Adaptation Fund Project
Vibe Ghana

Friday 17 February 2017

The Chiefs and people of the Northern, Upper East and Upper West Regions have been urged to embrace the Adaptation Fund Project to help increase climate resilience and enhance sustainable land and water management in the areas. The Adaptation Fund was established under the Kyoto Protocol of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2001 to finance concrete adaptation projects and programmes in developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. The Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MEST) with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is implementing the project in some selected communities in the north. Mr Asher Nkegbe, the Upper East Regional Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), made the call when the technical team of the Project undertook separates community visits to the beneficiary communities in the Upper East Region to engage them on the project implementation and to solicit for their support in the process.

 

Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 -  Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

Outcome 2 - Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

Outcome 3 - Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Project Dates: 
2015 to 2019

Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda

The "Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda" project will support the Government of Uganda in the management of critical wetlands that are being affected by a changing climate. The project will restore wetlands and their eco-system services, based on the wise-use principles and guidelines  outlined by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. It also supports sustainable land management practices and reforestation, resilient agricultural practices and alternative livelihoods for communities living in these areas. This support will reduce the pressures on the wetlands. Finally the project seeks to strengthen the climate information and early warning systems to support these communities to make climate-resilient decisions.

The impact of climate change, coupled with other human and environmental stressors, is increasing degradation of wetlands and their associated ecosystem services in Uganda. This is negatively affecting the livelihoods of the people living in and around the wetlands – around 4,000,000 people. In fact, over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs. Given that wetlands are highly vulnerable to changes in the quantity and quality of their water supply, climate change will most likely substantially alter ecologically important attributes of wetlands and will exacerbate the impacts from human activity. On the other hand, the loss of wetlands could exacerbate the impact of climate change in as they provide fundamental services that contribute to mitigation of such impacts.

 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (32.695312486957 0.89058628208695)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
800,000 people living in and around the wetlands of Southwestern and Eastern Uganda.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$45 million total, US$24.9 million from Green Climate Fund, US$20.1 million from Government of Uganda and UNDP

ProDocs

GCF Funding Proposal Uganda

Project Details: 

Uganda, wetlands provide many important functions to the people, particularly in the context of food security. This is in addition to its role as a habitat for biodiversity that is also important for the economy. According to a recent 2013 study on the value of wetlands in Uganda, several market and non-market benefits are identified: “The market benefits include water for domestic use and watering of livestock, support to dry season agriculture, provision of handicrafts, building materials, and food resources such as fish, yams, vegetables, wild game, and medicine. The non-market benefits include flood control, purification of water, and maintenance of the water table, microclimate moderation, and storm protection. Wetlands also serve as habitats for important flora and fauna, have aesthetic and heritage values, and contain stocks of biodiversity of potentially high pharmaceutical value. Over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs.” In addition to supporting food and water security, wetlands also support income generation and employment. “Of a total population of 34 million Ugandans, it is estimated that wetlands provide about 320,000 workers with direct employment and provide subsistence employment for over 2.4 million.”

Wetland health and resilience can easily be compromised by climate change impacts. Climate change models for Uganda predict that temperatures will continue to increase, and there will be changes in the seasonal distribution and amount of rainfalls, more frequent extreme weather events, and increases in the frequency of heavy rainfalls. Increases in temperature and erratic rainfall will result in more frequent and intense floods, droughts and heat waves, which will directly threaten wetlands and livelihoods that rely on its healthy ecosystem services. Hydrologic and drainage maps of the project targeted sites (the eastern and southwestern Wetlands Basin) indicate that most of the freshwater inflows pass through the wetlands and natural forests. These systems have played an integral role in maintaining the quality of water over the centuries. However, over the last three decades, climate change impacts, as well as other baseline (non-climate) issues such as excessive sedimentation and non-native species invasions, have resulted in substantial water quality deterioration.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Restoration and management of wetland hydrology and associated forests
Under this sub-component, at least 760 km2 of degraded wetlands and its associated catchment will be restored and the lives of 500,000 people will be improved in selected districts of Eastern and South Western Uganda. The overall aim of the intervention is to restore the ecological and hydrological integrity of the wetland and support the development and implementation of a community-based framework for wetland management plans. This will help support climate risk management and resilient livelihoods through enhanced ecosystems services in the area.

Output 2: Improved agricultural practices and alternative livelihood options in the wetland catchment
This output will target at least 150,000 farmers including those who currently do not have secure access to irrigation, land-poor farmers, women-headed households, and the landless, to build more climate-resilient livelihoods. Investments in small-scale rural infrastructure (shallow bore wells, drip irrigation, tilling tools) for agricultural purposes, especially on-farm water management infrastructure such as dams, canals, drip irrigation systems, as well as farming best practices and crop diversification will be implemented to realize high economic return given their coverage. In addition, the output will focus on technical skills training for employment in key economic sectors viable in wetland areas, such as tourism, health and construction. Most of the beneficiaries have very low levels of education and no skills that can help them find a job. Beneficiaries will be trained in specific skills with high employability potential (e.g. earth mover, driver, assistant nurse, reception clerk in hotels, desktop publishing).Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management

Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management
This output will focus on strengthening access to reliable climate-related information and scaling up advisories for farmers and other target communities in the two wetland target areas, to improve the adaptation capacity of the entire population in and around the wetlands – around 1 million people. This will include the expansion of networks that generate and process climate-related data into relevant information to the scale and location of local districts, villages or communities, as well as dissemination of climate-related information/services, advisories and early warnings to communities. A strong focus of this output will be on delivering actionable climate-related information to communities, taking the form of agro-met advisories for agriculture, as well as the dissemination channels for making information available to the “last mile.”

Contacts: 
UNDP
Benjamin Larroquette
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
Green Climate Fund
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Funding Proposal approved by Green Climate Fund Board: 30 June 2016
Funded Activity Agreement (FAA) effectiveness reached: 6 July 2017
Project Document signature between UNDP and Government: 7 July 2017
Project financing agreement signed between UNDP and Government: 23 August 2017
Request from UNDP to GCF to release funding: 13 October 2017
Inception Workshop - Begin Project Implementation: 29 November 2017

 

 

 

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In the News

Government of Uganda and UNDP launch implementation of a $44.26 million project to restore wetlands and build community resilience

The Government of Uganda and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have kick-started a new project on "building community resilience, wetlands ecosystems and associated catchments in Uganda." The new project, which is Uganda’s first Green Climate Fund-financed initiative, is a response to the Presidential Initiative on Wetlands. The project inception meeting held on 29 November 2017 marks the start of project implementation and comes after both entities signed a financing agreement in August 2017 for the project, which is intended to restore degraded wetlands, improve ecosystems, and strengthen climate information and early warning systems. The grant based project will target an estimated 4 million people who live in and around Uganda’s wetlands and rely on them for food security. It is part of both the Government Uganda and United Nations efforts to promote Sustainable Development Goal 13 on climate action as well as fulfil its obligations to the Paris Agreement on Climate Change which it ratified last year. “Fighting climate change and its effects is now a key goal for the Government of Uganda. We are delighted that this project is going to enable us to respond to the President’s call to protect wetlands and boost our ongoing efforts in climate change mitigation and adaptation,” Hon. Mary Goretti Kitutu, the State Minister Environment, said at the inception workshop for the project.

 

Uganda, UNDP Sign Landmark Financing Agreement to Restore Wetlands

Chimp Reports
25 August 2017

The Government of Uganda and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have today August 23 signed a financing agreement for the Green Climate Fund (GCF) project to restore degraded wetlands, improve ecosystems, strengthen climate information and early warning systems. Hon. Matia Kasaija, the Finance Minister signed on behalf of the Government and Ms. Rosa Malango, the UNDP Resident Representative and UN Resident Coordinator for Uganda signed on behalf of UNDP.

 

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About (Summary): 
The Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda project will support the Government of Uganda in the management of critical wetlands that are being affected by a changing climate. The project will restore wetlands and their eco-system services, based on the wise-use principles and guidelines outlined by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. It also supports sustainable land management practices and reforestation, resilient agricultural practices and alternative livelihoods for communities living in these areas. This support will reduce the pressures on the wetlands. Finally the project seeks to strengthen the climate information and early warning systems to support these communities to make climate-resilient decisions. The impact of climate change, coupled with other human and environmental stressors, is increasing degradation of wetlands and their associated ecosystem services in Uganda. This is negatively affecting the livelihoods of the people living in and around the wetlands – around 4,000,000 people. In fact, over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs. Given that wetlands are highly vulnerable to changes in the quantity and quality of their water supply, climate change will most likely substantially alter ecologically important attributes of wetlands and will exacerbate the impacts from human activity. On the other hand, the loss of wetlands could exacerbate the impact of climate change in as they provide fundamental services that contribute to mitigation of such impacts.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

 

Output 1: Restoration and management of wetland hydrology and associated forests 

 

Output 2: Improved agricultural practices and alternative livelihood options in the wetland catchment

 

Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management

 

 

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2025

Solomon Islands Water Sector Adaptation (SIWSAP)

The impacts of climate change, particularly sea-level rise (SLR) and pronounced droughts have severe consequences on water and sanitation in the country. The areas which are most vulnerable to SLR are low-lying islands, atolls and flat deltaic regions at the mouth of larger rivers. Intrusion of salt water from rise in sea level has affected groundwater resources, especially freshwater aquifers (lens) in small atolls and low-lying islands that rely on rainfall or groundwater for their freshwater supply. Droughts have severely affected water supplies and have also damaged crops and livelihoods. Likewise, climate-related impacts on the quality and quantity of water has a gender dimension; in the context of the ethnic tensions, the safety and security of women and girls are compromised as they need to travel further to collect water, also leading to less time for other activities.

To improve the resilience of water resources to the impacts of climate change in order to improve health, sanitation and quality of  life, and sustain livelihoods in targeted vulnerable areas.  The project will focus on issues of water supply and sanitation.

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects, click here.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (159.697262571 -8.98782221794)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural and township communities of the Solomon Islands in 6 provinces: Gizo, Taro, Tingoa, Ferafalu, Tuwo, and Santa Catalina.
Funding Source: 

ProDocs

Solomon Island LDCF Project Document

PIFs

Solomon Islands PIF 4568 (May 2012)

Financing Amount: 
$6,850,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$40,255,000
Project Details: 

Based on the LDCF resources requested and the scope of the climate change adaptation measures, the project will cover work in 6 pilot sites. On a national scale there are a number of benefits that this project will contribute to.

  • More than 70% of the national population i.e. more than 360,000 people benefit from communal water systems and natural water sources and do not rely on government managed water supply systems. Many of these supply systems are dependent on water catchments and underground aquifers aquifers that are very sensitive to the hydrological cycle and its disturbances, most of which are related to climate change. Lessons from the project could be multiplied for the benefit of this population.
  • Improvements to water supply will also result in more people having access to proper sanitation facilities, potentially reduce prevalence of disease and reduced costs to the people and to government’s social services
  • UNDP estimates that water supply investment has an economic return of $4.4 to $1 while investment in sanitation has a return of $9.1 to $1. Some of the multiplier effects of investing in water and sanitation include; healthy workers, savings on medicines, bottled water not required, boost to agriculture and healthy tourists
  • Increasing preparedness and enhancing resilience of the water sector to extreme events can potentially reduce the cost to government for disaster relief. Over the past few years flooding, king tides, excessive rainfall and storm surges have rendered rural locations and communities as disaster areas with the frequency of calls for disaster relief assistance from the national government reaching levels never before experienced in the country since it attained political independence in 1978
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Integrate water conservation and sustainable water resources management in all sectors and communities.

The outputs include: construction of village/community water tanks; construction of water reservoirs for institutional and residential areas; upgrading of existing reservoirs, protective structures/access roads; promote/build household rainwater harvesting; construction of strategic storage water reserve tank; engineered or “climate proofed” water reservoirs; develop and implement Water Use efficiency Plan; raise awareness for water conservation.

Outcome 2: Incorporate climate change adaptation strategies into the guidelines and criteria for design and construction of appropriate water infrastructure in vulnerable areas.

The outputs include: guidelines for development of water supply in rural areas developed; inventory of POPs and adequate storage and leakage prevention conducted; good practice guidance for pesticide storage and use, and application developed and used; drought and its effect on water distribution in rural areas assessed; rainwater harvesting technologies developed and used.

Outcome 3: Increased reliability and quality of water supply to all sectors and communities

The outputs include: capacity of water supply increased; water reticulation and distribution systems improved and where necessary constructed; arable land improved and rehabilitated; sustainable use of water on commercial agriculture land; build appropriate low-technology irrigation system for farmers; diversification food crops with a focus on high-yielding crop varieties promoted; promote water conservation and water use efficiency; prevent land-based pollution.

Outcome 4: Enhanced institutional and legal framework for water resources management

The outputs include: individual and institutional capacity for sustainable water management built and/or enhanced; water resources sector policy developed and implemented; water resources sector legislation developed and adopted; water sector plans and programmes developed and implemented.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Patrick Rose
CO Focal Point
Ministry of Mines Energy and Rural Electrification
Rance Sore
Project Director
UNDP
Jose Padilla
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Championed by the Government of the Solomon Islands through the Ministry of Mines, Energy and Rural Electrification (MMERE) Water Resources Division (WRD) in partnership with Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology (MECDM), and other line ministries, SIWSAP activities are designed to ensure access to safe and affordable drinking water and increase reliability and quality of water supplies in targeted areas. Longer-term project measures are working to integrate climate-resilient water management in policy and development frameworks; encourage investments in cost-effective and adaptive water management technologies; and improve governance and knowledge management for climate change adaptation in the water sector at the local and national levels.

Project Dates: 
2014 to 2019

Biodiversity Conservation and Watershed Management in Haiti

The project titled “Increasing the Resilience of Ecosystems and Vulnerable Communities through Biodiversity Conservation and Watershed Management in Haiti” has the twin objectives of reducing vulnerability of poor people to the effects of climate change, and conserving threatened coastal and marine biodiversity.

The project will look at spatially configuring watersheds and coastal areas in order to increase the resilience of ecosystems and vulnerable communities to climate change and anthropic threats.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-72.2900390808 18.7971180326)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Vulnerable communities of the coastal regions of Haiti
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$14,750,000 (As of June 2014)

PIFs

Co-Financing Total: 
$14,750,000 (As of June 2014, )
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has two main components with the following associated outputs –

  1. Increased resilience to climate threats in key watersheds and coastal ecosystems through an improved governance framework including policies, plans and decision making for ecosystem-based adaptation (Output 1.1); conservation and effective management of ecosystems to promote ecosystem based adaptation including the development of models for climate-resilient natural resource management (Output 1.2) and; assisted rehabilitation to recover ecosystem functionality (Output 1.3).
  2. Establishment and management of PAs in the marine and coastal zones of target watersheds through refined proposals for the PA estate in the MCZ (Output 2.1) and; strengthening instruments and capacities for the effective management of Pas (Output 2.2).

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Lyes Ferroukhi
Regional Technical Advisor
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Adaptation to Climate Change through Integrated Water Harvesting Technologies in Yemen

As a Least Developed Country (LDC), Yemen is highly vulnerable to climate change-related impacts such as drought, extreme flooding, and sea level rise. These are serious concerns as Yemen's economy largely depends on its natural resources. In addition to having a predominantly semi-arid to arid climate, more than half the agriculture is rain-fed. Coupled with a rise in both droughts and floods, the Yemenis face an acute challenge in adapting to climate change induced stress on water resources.

Thus, the project titled “Adaptation to Climate Change through Integrated Water Harvesting Technologies in Yemen” aims to reintroduce traditional and innovative water harvesting techniques to improve water availability to rainfed farmers and pastoralists who are highly vulnerable to climate change.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (49.2187499837 16.6572436585)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Agriculturalists and pastoralists of 6 governorates of Yemen - Ibb, Taiz, Sana’a, Dhamar, Al Mahweet and Al Mukalla
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$5,387,400 (As of 22 January 2013, detailed in PIF)

PIFs

Yemen – LDCF Project Identification Form (22 January 2013)

Co-Financing Total: 
$19,601,596 (As of 22 January 2013, detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has three main components with the following associated outcomes –

  1. Development of policies for traditional and innovative water harvesting systems including development of GIS-based rainfall-runoff models (Output 1.1); integration of water harvesting regulations into the water laws of Yemen (Output 1.2) and; formulation of long term, climate resilient water plans that include integrated water harvesting (Output 1.3)
  2. Development of on-ground measures for water harvesting and rehabilitation of traditional water harvesting structures. This component  includes the reintroduction of five traditional water harvesting technologies (Output 2.1); introduction of fog harvesting technology (Output 2.2); training of community members on construction and maintenance of water harvesting technologies (Output 2.3); establishment of integrated groundwater recharge systems (Output 2.4) and supplementary irrigation (Output 2.5) and; design and deployment of awareness raising programmes to promote socio-economic benefits of water harvesting (Output 2.6).
  3. Development of decentralised and community led water management systems including customer-oriented water distribution and seasonal rationing services for communal harvested water (Output 3.1); capacity building to support a range of water harvesting technology designs and maintenance requirements (Output 3.2) and; introduction of incentives, such as concessional micro-loans, community grants, employment guarantee (Output 3.3).

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Reducing risk and vulnerability to climate change in Colombia

With one of the highest rates of disaster occurrences in Latin America, Colombia experiences on average 2.97 disasters per year - floods and landslides accounted for a third of these between 1970-1999. The increasing intensity of these events has consequently pushed back advances in social development, leading to increased inequality and poverty. This UNDP-supported project, “Reducing risk and vulnerability to climate change in the region of La Depresión Momposina in Colombia,” focuses on the municipalities of Ayapel, San Marcos and San Benito Abad to reduce the vulnerabilities of communities and wetlands to climate-related flooding and drought risks. 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-75.498 9.1021)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Local communities in the municipalities of Ayapel, San Marcos and San Benito Abad
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$ 8,518,307 (as detailed in the Project Proposal of May 2012)

PIFs

Colombia AF Project Proposal

Project Details: 

The Ministry of Environment and the United Nations Program for Development Fund resources Kyoto Protocol are running the 'Reducing Risk and Vulnerability against Climate Change in the Region of the Depression Momposina in Colombia' project. This project seeks to reduce the vulnerability of communities to the risks of flooding and drought associated with climate change and increase the resilience of ecosystems in this region. Its main activities focus on the municipalities of Ayapel in Córdoba, San Marcos and San Benito Abad, Sucre.  This initiative has been implemented in association with Local Climate Change Consolidation Platform, made up of community leaders and local institutions. 

 
As part of the efforts to strengthen the platforms, a theoretical workshop - 'Sharing knowledge on agro-ecological production practices adapted to the effects of climate change with a focus on risk management and environmental disasters' was conducted, where 33 promoters from 11 communities in the municipalities where the project develops participated.  
 
The workshop was aimed at strengthening the capacity of rural communities that are part of the associative platforms, which requires a knowledge sharing on agro-ecological practices. These included the use of native seeds for planting and establishment of crops of vegetables, fruit, timber, medicinal, aromatic and ornamental; use of (plant and animal) local resources to manage pests, diseases and animal feeding. Theme agrochemicals decrease was also implemented in the establishment of crops, crop rotation and staggered plantings, hedges management and crop management, among others.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project objective is to reduce the vulnerability of communities and of wetlands in the region of La Depresion Momposina to flooding and drought risks associated with climate change and variability. To achieve this objective the project will include the following four components:

  1. The existing hydroclimatological and environmental information system (HEIS) is strengthened and used by local- and regional-level stakeholders, reducing their exposure to the impacts of climate change.
  2. Wetlands and their hydrology in the target area are rehabilitated as a means of reducing risk to flooding and drought associated with climate change and variability.
  3. Increased adaptive capacity of local communities in three targeted municipalities through the introduction of agroecological practices that help reduce their vulnerability to the impacts of climate change.
  4. Institutional and policy capacity strengthened for mainstreaming climate risk management and adaptation measures into planning and decision-making processes. 
Contacts: 
UNDP
Gabor Vereczi
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Strengthening Livelihood Resilience & Managing Disaster Risks for Afghan Communities

This UNDP-supported and GEF-LDCF funded project, Strengthening Livelihood Resilience & Managing Disaster Risks for Afghan communitiesis working to deliver tangible socio-economic benefits by investing in and restoring ecological infrastructure such as rangelands. Rangelands are vital to the Afghan economy since they support livestock production and related industries and provide natural products such as fruits and nuts. With the enhanced resilience of ecosystems, climate change induced changes and extreme events are likely to be more gradual and less severe than under a ‘business as usual’ scenario. This will help reduce livelihood losses from severe climate events. Finally, investments in small-scale rural infrastructure such as water management and irrigation will contribute to higher food security and poverty reduction for those currently operating on rain fed land. 

In the long-term, strengthening the resilience of Afghan communities to climate change will require a step change in current practices. To begin with, a greater level of awareness and a more robust knowledge base of climate change impacts are required. Policy and planning must fully incorporate climate risks, particularly in the District Development Plans and Community Development Plans. Restoring the depleted natural resource base and managing it in a more sustainable manner is a fundamental component of building resilience. Moving beyond subsistence agriculture to food and income security, along with a shift toward more diverse and less vulnerable livelihoods, is also essential. Finally, large-scale investments in climate resilient infrastructure such as storage reservoirs and more efficient irrigation systems are another important pre-condition.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (69.6204 35.3605)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural communities in Panjshir, Balkh, Uruzgan and Herat Provinces
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
9,000,000.00 (Indicative Grant Amount total as detailed in the PIF, November 2012)

UNDP and climate adaptation in Panjshir

Afghanistan is one of the most vulnerable countries for climate change; even here, in beautiful, mountainous Panjshir province.

Quarterly Updates

Project Progress Report, Third Quarter 2016

PIFs

PIF - Afghanistan, 7 Nov 2012

Co-Financing Total: 
30,500,000.00 (Indicative co-financing total as detailed in the PIF, November 2012)
Project Details: 

While Afghanistan has made measurable progress in human development over the past six years, it remains one of the poorest and most vulnerable countries in the world. It ranked 172 in UNDP’s Human Development Report 2011. The Global Adaptation Index ranks it as the most vulnerable country in the world, taking into account the country’s exposure, sensitivity and ability to cope with climate related hazards. Climate change scenarios for Afghanistan suggest temperature increases of up to 4°C by the 2060s (from 1970-1999 averages), and a corresponding decrease in rainfall. The biophysical effects of climate change are expected to be significant; droughts are likely to be the norm by 2030 leading to associated dynamics of desertification and land degradation. Coping with the impacts of climate change is a major challenge for development in Afghanistan given that its negative effects are likely to be most severely felt by the poor and marginalized due to their high dependence on natural resources and limited capacity to cope with the impacts of climate variability and extremes.

Afghanistan has a predominately dry continental climate with wide extremes of temperature. High mountain ranges characterize much of the topography; a quarter of the country’s land sits at more than 2,500m above sea level. While annual precipitation exceeds 1,000mm in the upper mountains of the northwest, it is less than 400 mm over 75 percent of the country and virtually all of the cultivable land. The cultivable area of Afghanistan is estimated to be 7.7 million ha, representing about 12 percent of the country’s area. Approximately 42 percent is intensively or intermittently irrigated. The importance of irrigated agriculture cannot be overstated, since it is the mainstay of food security and income for the majority of the rural population, accounting for more than 70 percent of total crop production. The 2008 State of the Environment report makes it clear that water is the country’s most critical natural resource and key to the health and well-being of the Afghan people.

The main climatic hazards identified in the NAPA are periodic droughts, floods due to untimely and heavy rainfall, flooding due to the thawing of snow and ice, and increasing temperatures (see Table 1). There is a discernible trend that these events are occurring more regularly and are more intense in nature. There have been severe flood or drought events in 8 out of the past 11 years. In fact, the period 1998-2006 marked the longest and most severe drought in Afghanistan’s known climatic history. At the same time, flood risk is also increasing as rainfall patterns have become more erratic. Areas that traditionally receive 250 mm of rain over a period of six months are now receiving that amount of rainfall during the course of only one or two months, with a devastating effect on agriculture and livelihoods. Unless action is taken to strengthen the resilience of Afghan communities and reduce disaster risk, climate change impacts will jeopardize development gains and could push an even greater number of Afghans into poverty.

More information to come...

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • 1.1 Mainstreamed adaptation in broader development frameworks at country level and in targeted vulnerable areas
  • 1.2 Reduced vulnerability to climate change in development sectors
  • 1.3 Diversified and strengthened livelihoods and sources of income for vulnerable people in targeted areas
  • 2.3 Strengthened awareness and ownership of adaptation and climate risk reduction processes at local level

 

Expected Outcomes

Expected Outputs

Climate change risk and variability integrated into local planning and budgeting processes

 

 

Climate change scenarios developed for the agriculture sector in selected provinces

 

Trained at least 250 provincial MAIL officials, farmers and pastoralists on climate risk information and appropriate response measures

 

10 climate sensitive Community Development Plans formulated

 

Rural income and livelihood opportunities for vulnerable communities enhanced and diversified

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At least 100 women trained on alternative livelihoods to farming (e.g. embroidery and carpet weaving)

 

Business development training in handicrafts and small-scale manufacturing provided to 20 rural entrepreneurs and 10 SMEs

 

2,000 hectares of degraded rangelands planted with stress resistant seedling varieties

 

Productive infrastructure improvements

Small-scale storage reservoirs (less than 20m high) built in selected river sub-basins in 10 communities

 

Micro-water harvesting techniques introduced in 10 communities

 

20 karezes[1] and canals improved and rehabilitated to reduce water losses

 

At least 20 check dams, contour bunds and other facilities built to conserve water and enhance groundwater recharge

 

 

 



[1] A kareze is an underground canal system that taps aquifers by gravity through a series of subsurface tunnels. It often extends for many kilometers before surfacing to provide water for drinking and irrigation.

 

More information to come...

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

More information to come...

Contacts: 
UNDP
Faris Khader
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Mamunul Khan
Head of the Sustainable Development Unit
UNDP
Nilofer Malik
Programme Associate
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


Information in French / Informations en français: 


Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 


Civil Society Engagement: 


Effective Governance for Small-scale Rural Infrastructure and Disaster Preparedness in Lao PDR

Lao PDR is one of the poorest countries in the world and according to IPCC findings particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Low productive agriculture, poor infrastructure development and according low-levels of service delivery jointly contribute to low adaptive capacity of livelihood systems, which are already affected by impacts deriving from existing climate variability. Stresses on livelihoods will further increase due to expected climate change.

The project Effective Governance for Small-scale Rural Infrastructure and Disaster Preparedness in a Changing Climate (2013-2017) is working to ensure that the genuine needs of communities vulnerable to climate variability and change are fully reflected in local planning and budget processes, so that the development prospects are secured in face of increasing climate risks.  Barriers to remove include weaknesses in climate change analysis and planning at sub-national level, financial constraints in resourcing the additional costs of building greater redundancy into rural infrastructure, a silo approach to local planning whereby ecosystem functions and services are not taken into account, and the limited incentives that exist to encourage local officials and decision makers to address climate-related risks.

With the support of the Least Developed Countries Fund, the Government of Lao PDR is addressing the barriers through three components:

Capacity-building measures for climate sensitive planning targeting sub-district, district and provincial decision makers and planners will demonstrate the features and advantages of integrated ecosystems management and climate resilient physical infrastructure solutions.

Socially inclusive tools of project identification will ensure that the different vulnerabilities of target populations in a changing climate are tackled and climate-sensitive district budgets are elaborated and their execution monitored. This newly acquired expertise will facilitate the delivery of grants to implement climate resilient small scale infrastructure, benefitting 50,000 people, linked to the well-established UNDP/UNCDF supported block grant mechanisms (District Development Fund). This will further strengthen local governance and administrative systems for better planning, budgeting and implementation services.

Environmental sustainability and project integration will be achieved through measures to protect ecosystem functions in the immediate vicinity of physical infrastructure  covering 60,000 hectares, enhancing  capacities to regulate water flows and ensuring greater financial viability and social impact overall.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (106.721 15.3469)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
4,700,000 (GEF) as of January 2013
Co-Financing Total: 
375,000 (Government in kind), 4,210,000 (Government parallel), 4,150,000 (IUCN parallel), 21,857,896 (UNDP parallel), 280,000 (UNDP)
Project Details: 

Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR) is amongst the poorest and Least Developed Countries (LDC) in Asia and in the World. The UNDP Human Development Report 2011 ranked Lao PDR at 138 out of 187 countries in the Human Development Index (HDI) in terms of comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standards of other countries worldwide. A major factor contributing to this high ranking is that more than 80% of Lao PDR’s population depend on natural resources, agriculture and forestry production as a main source of income , while the productivity of that sector, which accounts for only 30% of Lao PDR’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP)  remains low.

Poor infrastructure development in agricultural production, accessing markets, the supply of water for irrigation and domestic purposes, poor access to education and health facilities collectively contribute to high poverty rates and low development progress in Lao PDR. Only 17% of national rice production is derived from irrigated fields along the main streams. There is potential to increase the production of irrigated rice, especially through small-scale irrigation in uplands, which currently plays a minor role. 31% of the rural population still have no road access to markets and public utility services . The World Health Organisation estimates that since 1995 there has been a significant increase in the percentage of the rural population with access to water from an improved source – from 37% to 51% in 2008.  Access to both education and health facilities by 84% of the population is showing improvements in development standards . However, the low quality of associated services continues to contribute to poverty and remains to be improved.

Good and effective governance is a precondition for changing the service delivery situation and for achieving equitable and sustainable economic growth as laid out in the 7th National Socioeconomic Development Plan. It is expected that, with the support of the UN system, especially the poor and vulnerable will benefit from improved delivery of public services and greater participation in transparent decision-making by 2015 . This participatory approach applies also for initiatives that link climate change adaptation, disaster risk reduction and public service delivery.

Such an integrated approach is required since service delivery in MDG relevant sectors such as public health, education, water supply, sanitation and agricultural production has been a great challenge in the past due to existing current climate variability’s between dry and wet seasons. As an example, the flow of the Mekong at Pakse in Southern Laos is characterized by a mean difference in monthly discharge between driest and wettest seasons which is almost 15 fold. Therefore local communities and the public investments that support them already have to deal with a challenging water resource context, in which localized natural disasters linked to flooding, landslides and drought are common. 

Stresses on livelihoods within current climate variability will further increase due to climate change. The available climate science indicates that dry seasons are likely to increase in length in Lao PDR while wet season rainfall will occur in even shorter, more intense intervals. Analysis of historical rainfall data for the country indicates a clear trend towards more high intensity events when comparing the period from 1901 to 1953 with the period from 1953 to 2006. Recent vulnerability and adaptation analysis indicates that there has been an increase in the number of climate hazard related events (such as floods) over the past 20 years as opposed to the preceding 30 years. This is confirmed by MRC data which has identified a clear increase in the number of extreme flooding events across the country when comparing pre and post 1986 data. Further Lefroy (2010) states that while the incidence of tropical storms and hurricanes is very variable, there is evidence that the number and intensity of storm events has increased significantly in the last few decades of the 20th Century and that this trend appears likely to continue and increase. For the future annual precipitation for the Mekong region as a whole is projected to increase by 13.5% by 2030, with most of this occurring during the wet season (May – September).  While projected changes in dry season precipitation are likely to be smaller, significant decreases are possible in February and March as well as in November. The drier extremes of current projections indicate decreases of up to 25% against historical values.  Use of macro-scale hydrological models for a range of emission scenarios for Lao PDR indicate that, in the future, many of its sub-basins are likely to experience higher discharge (NAPA, 2009).
 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1.1: Technical capacity in climate resilient planning, focusing on links between improved ecosystem management and sustainability of investments in small scale rural water infrastructure, enhanced for at least 250 national, province, district and village officials, as well as other community stakeholders.  This output is designed to enable all other project Outcomes and Outputs by building in the necessary understanding of climate risks to strengthen local development planning from the project outset. The approach taken will be to build directly on the initial capacity assessment carried out during the PPG phase, and convert this into a detailed and fully costed capacity development plan. It will also provide a key collaboration point with the baseline ADB supported IWRM programme which is providing capacity development for IWRM at both national and province levels, largely the same audience of individuals.  

Output 1.2: Village level water harvesting, storage, and distribution infrastructure adaptation solutions (with associated ecosystem management options) identified, prioritised and integrated into district development plans. This output supports the annual planning exercise carried out by the District Development Support Committees. It will provide technical and organisational inputs to be arranged and delivered by MONRE and its province and district level structures.  It will help districts to secure an additional financial envelope for climate resilient investments, which will be delivered annually to districts bank accounts set up under Outcome 2.  It will also provide the starting point for more detailed subsequent field analysis through CRVA, to be carried out under Outputs 1.3 and 1.4.  While these are not mandatory investments they demonstrate the most likely areas for climate resilient investment and districts may choose for some to be carried forward into detailed design, as presented.

Output 1.3: Climate risk, vulnerability and adaptation assessments (CRVA) carried out at 48 project sites in 12 districts of Sekong and Saravane provinces and proposed climate resilient investments adjusted to take account of site specific adaptation concerns. This will support the detailed engineering design of the approved climate resilient investment projects.  A fundamental premise is that adaptation solutions are location specific. While there is some value in generic or ‘model’ solutions they will always need to be fine-tuned to physical, environmental and social realities on the ground. In some cases this will lead to an adjustment upwards in financial resources. In all cases the process of introducing and revising an approach via CRVA, will increase local ownership and ultimately the long term sustainability of the investment.

Output 1.4: Detailed climate resilient project investments finalised and tender documents prepared in 12 districts, as well as associated dialogues to facilitate the implementation of annual district investment plans in 12 districts.  Following on from fine tuning and building local acceptance and ownership, so investments will need to be tendered to contractors for which additional professional technical services will be required. In order cases this expertise will be found at the community level and the resources can be channelled directly from the district level against an agreed workplan and set of deliverables.

Output 1.5: Guidelines for climate resilient construction for small-scale rural infrastructure sectors (irrigation, water supply, rural roads, education, and health) developed, applied and revised. These guidelines will be presented in various policy forums with the intent of contributing to future adjustments to national standards that are applicable. The reforms of national standards are seldom made on the basis of the outcomes of a single project, however successful that project may be.  The success of this output will therefore depend upon the extent to which a broad range of experience can be gathered together, and national champions can be identified to support a reform process. 

Output 2.1: An incentive mechanism, rewarding districts performing well in planning, budgeting and implementation of climate resilient, ecosystem based small-scale water infrastructure is developed, tested and under operation to drive the delivery of LDCF climate resilient infrastructure grants. This output will result in the tailoring and extension of a pre-existing local development fund mechanism (the District Development Fund) to incorporate all the necessary skills, and capacities to channel and report on additional climate adaptation funding through national systems.  Through this approach the project seeks to ensure that the project can be easily replicated in other districts and can provide a means to access and channel other public resources in the future, both national budgetary resources and international funds.   

Output 2.2: At least 48 small-scale infrastructure investment projects (1 per district per year), including components of water harvesting, storage, distribution and/or irrigation of the priority lists that have been CRVA assessed are implemented benefiting 50,000 people.   Output 2 will follow a phased approach. In the first year 12 infrastructure investments will be selected from the V&A report (Annex 8) for further analysis and funding, applying the detailed CRVA approach. From the second year onwards the selection of investments will follow the same technical approach (V&A and CRVA) but influenced also by the newly established performance based mechanism leading to differing levels of financial allocation from one district to the next.

Output 3.1: Up to nine ecosystem management and action plans with a coverage of at least 60,000 Ha to protect 48 small-scale climate resilient rural infrastructure projects are designed, implemented and monitored for effectiveness. The management and actions plans, which will include budgeted field based activities, will be developed during Year 1 and progressively implemented from Year 2 onwards through specific interventions on the ground, which will be selected and designed using the existing local planning dialogues and structures.  This work will be carried out in close coordination with the ADB-IWRM planning being carried out for Sekong River Basin in the South. 

Output 3.2: Awareness-raising activities implemented, learning materials developed and disseminated and regular dialogues held between communities and tiers of the local administration on the linkages between ecosystems management and small-scale climate resilient infrastructure solutions. The main aim of this output will be to provide clear guidance and direction on how ecosystem based approaches can be integrated into local development planning, using infrastructure investments as a starting point. The opportunities for achieving this are likely to vary considerably from one district to the next depending on prevailing land use and management practices.  This Output will need to be delivered in parallel with Output 3.1 since it underpins the development of the ecosystem management and action plans. Much of the work will involve motivating local officials and other stakeholders to visit specific sites, view problems on the ground, and jointly identify solutions. The frequent repetition of this approach each year of the project will induce behavioural changes in the way planning is carried out, through the integration of more evidenced based information and through the involvement of a wider range of stakeholders in formulating and agreeing local plans. This work will build directly on the national water dialogues that have been carried out by MONRE with support from IUCN.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

More information to come...

Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


Information in French / Informations en français: 


Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 


Civil Society Engagement: 


CBA Morocco: Enhancing the Resilience of the Iguiwas Oasis Ecosystem to the Impacts of Climate Change (Tiflit)

This project works with a rural oasis community in southern Morocco. The village is faced with high levels of environmental degradation that are exacerbated by increasing resource demands due to population growth. Climate change is projected to increase temperatures and reduce rainfall throughout Morocco, further amplifying these effects. Declining rainfall in the Anti-Atlas Mountains will reduce the groundwater available to communities throughout southern Morocco, likely prompting land abandonment and threatening native species that define the cool Oasis microclimate.

This Community-Based Adaptation project aims to improve the Iguiwaz oasis ecosystem’s resiliency toward the risks of climate change, including variability, through reasoned water management and the institution of a local participative dialogue policy. Its activities facilitate sustainable access to and management of water, plant/replant drought-resistant crops and fodder, and regenerate the ecosystem through resilient forestry practices.

This project is part of Morocco's Community-Based Adaptation portfolio. *

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((-8.00354003905 29.762573273, -7.96234130859 29.7816456982, -7.93487548828 29.7291877923, -7.98431396484 29.7148763269, -8.00354003905 29.762573273))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Oasis Communities
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$47,137

CBA - Morocco Sees a Mix of Community Volunteers and UNV volunteers

In Morocco, the people of Iquiwaz Oasis are feeling the effects of climate change. Community volunteers are working with the UNV-supported project, Community-based Adaptation to Climate Change, contributing their experience towards water-sharing systems and tree-planting initiatives, and sharing their knowledge with local youth

This video produced by UNV's "Share the Story" project. Visit facebook.com/unvolunteers for more.

Tiwizi - Community Unites for Adaptation to Climate Change

 

Tiwizi - Ensemble pour l'adaptation au changement climatique

 

News article

CBA Videos featured at COP17 Development & Climate Days (2011)

Brochures, Posters, Communications Products

CBA Morocco - Iguiwaz - Presentation note for Tiwizi video (FR)

CBA Morocco - Iguiwaz - Presentation note for Tiwizi video (EN)

PIFs

CBA Morocco - Iguiwaz - Project Proposal (FR)

CBA Morocco - Iguiwaz - Project Proposal (EN)

Co-Financing Total: 
$71,210
Project Details: 

The Iguiwaz Oasis, located in the province of Tata, in Southern Morocco, has nearly one hundred families (approximately 700 residents), most of them subsistence farmers. Like all oases in the region, it is very vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Increasing water scarcity and land erosion have been affected local living conditions, which depend on farming and the use of natural resources.

Since the late 1970s, climate change has impacted and will increasingly harm the delicate balance that allows the oasis ecosystem to function and regenerate while nourishing its inhabitants. The local farming, food-producing economy, which depends on the oasis' natural resources, is strongly affected by climatic variations, and therefore very sensitive to the impacts of climate change. Oasis agricultural productivity has decreased because of increasing water shortages coupled with poor management, along with soil depletion. Yet oases represent a vegetation and natural climate barrier against the advance of the desert. Their deterioration and the gradual abandonment of local palm groves will make it difficult to fight against desertification.

This Community-Based Adaptation project increases the Iguiwaz oasis ecosystem's resiliency to the impacts of climate change, particularly in regard to scarce water resources and accelerated soil degradation. Its comprehensive and integrated approach facilitates sustainable access to and management of water, enhances local farming through planting or replanting of drought-resistant farming species (including pilot testing of adapted fodder to sustain local livestock), and regenerates the ecosystem through resilient forestry practices (micro-dams to facilitate infiltration of water, which will in turn nourish the oasian farming, and forestry plantings to revitalize and fixate the soils). Income generation will be fostered, thus increasing local livelihood and reducing rural exodus. Capacity building and inclusive mobilization (promoted via the participatory video TIWIZI) foster sustainability and long-term vulnerability reduction. The lessons learned from the project will be disseminated for mainstreaming in local and national policies.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Result 1.0: Access to water for farming is facilitated and irrigation water resources management is improved

Establish a collective well equipped with a motor pump (Product 1.1) and establish an experimental drip irrigation system (Product 1.2) to cover irrigation water needs over approximately 3.5 ha.

Result 2.0: Forestry ecosystem and oasis farming made resilient to reduced water resources and soil degradation

Plant experimental farming and arboreal species (Output 2.1), along with resilient forest species (Output 2.2) to reduce erosion and water use.

Result 3.0: Reinforced community capacity to adapt sustainably

Implement an awareness-raising programme for sustainable water management and resilient agropastoral and forestry practices, including training on sustainable farming and irrigation (Output 3.1).

Result 4.0: Lessons learned capitalized and communicated to sustain local and regional policies

Produce participative documentary highlighting community contributions (see video) (Product 4.1). Community representatives participate in meetings with other oasis project leaders and present the adjustment plan to other communities (Product 4.2). Conduct a midway evaluation to assemble lessons learned and adjust course where necessary (Product 4.3) and organize a final evaluation/capitalization workshop (Product 4.4).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring and evaluation for community-based adaptation is a new field, and the CBA project is piloting innovative approaches to evaluating the success of locally-driven adaptation projects, and generating lessons to inform ongoing practice.

Key considerations in M&E for CBA include:

  • Grounding M&E in the local context: M&E for CBA should avoid overly rigid frameworks, recognizing community heterogeneity and maintaining local relevance
  • Capturing global lessons from local projects: CBA projects are highly contextualized, but lessons generated should be relevant to stakeholders globally
  • Incorporation of both quantitative and qualitative indicators: to ground projects in tangible changes that can be objectively evaluated, and to capture lessons and case studies for global dissemination

To these ends, the CBA project uses three indicator systems: the Vulnerability Reduction Assessment, the Small Grants Programme Impact Assessment System, and the UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework.

The Vulnerability Reduction Assessment (VRA)

The VRA is a question-based approach with the following aims:

  • To make M&E responsive to community priorities
  • To use M&E to make projects more accountable to local priorities
  • To make M&E capture community ideas and local knowledge
  • To gather community-level feedback to guide ongoing project management
  • To generate qualitative information
  • To capture lessons on specific issues within community-based adaptation
  • To generate case studies highlighting adaptation projects

The VRA follows UNDP's Adaptation Policy Framework, and is measured in a series of meetings with local community stakeholders. In these meetings, locally-tailored questions based on standard VRA questions/indicators are posed, and the community assigns a numerical score on a 1-10 scale for each question. Progress is evaluated through changes in scores over the course of implementation, as well as through qualitative data collected in community discussions surrounding the exercise.

UNDP has developed a Users Guide to the VRA (Espanol) (Francais) as a tool to assist practitioners to conceptualize and execute VRA measurements in the context of CBA projects.

The SGP Impact Assessment System (IAS)

The CBA, being a project of the GEF Strategic Priority on Adaptation, aims to increase the resilience of ecosystems and communities to the impacts of climate change, generating global environmental benefits, and increasing their resilience in the face of climate change impacts. To this end, the CBA projects use the SGP's impact assessment system for monitoring achievements in GEF focal areas (focusing primarily on biodiversity and sustainable land management).

The IAS is composed of a number of quantitative indicators which track biophysical ecosystem indicators, as well as policy impact, capacity development and awareness-building.

UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework

CBA projects also track quantitative indicators from UNDP's adaptation indicator framework, corresponding to the thematic area on natural resources management. More information on UNDP's indicator framework can be found on the UNDP climate change adaptation monitoring and evaluation website.

 

This description applies to all projects implemented through UNDP's Community-Based Adaptation programme. Specific details on this project's M&E will be included here as they become available. *

Contacts: 
UNDP
CBA Project Management Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SPA
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

CBA Kazakhstan: Reducing Vulnerability to Declining Water Supplies in Burevestnik (Water Users' Initiative Group)

Burevestnik village is a rural community in Naurzum district, Kostani Oblast, northern Kazakhstan. The village formerly produced the most wheat in the Soviet Union, and vast expanses of virgin land were developed for agriculture. At present, subsistence grain production is the dominant livelihood. Gully development and steppe fires have led to land degradation, which threatens the fragile soils of the region. Climate change adds to these pressures, as increasing aridity makes soils more erosive, and heightens risk of steppe fire in the project area.

This Community-Based Adaptation project integrates climate change risk management into sustainable agriculture and oasis management to reduce the village’s vulnerability to declining water availability. Additionally, the project builds on activities designed to reduce land degradation, and to revitalize the local oases through infrastructure repair and the development of new community-based institutional structures for their management.

This project is part of Kazakhstan's Community-Based Adaptation portfolio. *

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((64.5007385304 51.6454494865, 64.7918762257 51.6488580091, 64.7479309132 51.5123171428, 64.4732727101 51.5191539312, 64.5007385304 51.6454494865))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Farmers; Fishers; Women
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$50,000

Annual Reports

Community-Based Adaptation in Kazakhstan and Central Asia

PIFs

CBA Kazakhstan - Burevestnik - Project Proposal (EN)

CBA Kazakhstan - Burevestnik - Project Concept (EN)

CBA Kazakhstan - Burevestnik - Project Concept (RUS)

Co-Financing Total: 
Ak Tyrna Resource Center: $2,313; Zyto LLP: $352,126
Project Details: 

This Community-Based Adaptation project seeks to integrate climate change risk management into sustainable agriculture and oasis management in Burevestnik, Kazakhstan. The area is home to approximately 1,860 people, consisting of heads of large and small farms as well as employees, teachers, seasonal workers and their families. The main sources of livelihood are grain production, vegetable growing, livestock and fish-farming.

Most of the economic needs of the village rely on water from dams filled with spring floods. However, for a long period of time these structures were not maintained, so the erosive processes gradually affected the floodgate and led to an unacceptable increase in the ravines and gullies. This situation undermines the economies of local communities since dams play an important role for agricultural production and fish farming (which serves as alternative source of income), as well as roads and household water services.

A climate changed-related increase in aridity will deprive the local community of its only sources of industrial water and people will not be able to grow vegetables, raise fish or keep livestock. The main source of income - growing wheat - is also threatened under this scenario since much of the machinery functions using water. Increasing frequency of dry periods will lead to a decline in grain cultivation—heightening poverty and forcing migration, since grain is the main and practically the only source of livelihood.

This project seeks to reduce the vulnerability of the Burevestnik rural county community to declining water availability. It was prepared through a participatory process carried out by Burevestnik 2009 Farmers Association and involving local stakeholders. Based on these stakeholders’ input, the project will carry out a number of infrastructural and training-oriented activities. By eliminating erosion-driven ravines and establishing herbs and bushes, villagers will reduce land degradation. Other erosion control technologies—and the community capacity to use them—will also be piloted. The reconstruction of dams will be undertaken, and community-based institutional frameworks for the sustainable management of the water supply will be established. A broader awareness and capacity-building component will enable the community to manage water and soil resources in a climate-resilient manner.

Water conservation techniques will be demonstrated on private lands selected on a competitive basis. Particular attention will be given to households whose head is a woman. The main criteria of selection will be the willingness and the ability to make her own contribution to the project in the form of water storage, additional pipelines, planting materials, and labor force.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 (co-financing):  Degraded land restored

Eliminate erosion-causing ravines (Output 1.1), establish herbs and bushes (Output 1.2) and pilot other erosion control technologies to reduce land degradation (Output 1.3). Hold training workshops to enhance community capacity to reduce land degradation and employ degradation-control practices/technologies (Output 1.4).

Outcome 2 (co-financing): Sustainable water supplies for local communities restored/established.

Reconstruct oases and ensure their sustainable function (Output 2.1). Establish a community-based institutional framework and provide training to ensure sustainable management of oases and water supply (Output 2.2).

Outcome 3 (CBA-funded):  Community capacity to adapt to climate change increased

Train communities to manage water and soil resources with a focus on climate resiliency (Output 3.1), such that climate change risks are incorporated into oasis management (Output 3.2).

Outcome 4 (CBA-funded):  Alternative livelihood practices piloted

Demonstrate drought-resistant grain (Output 4.1) and vegetable production (Output 4.2), as well as water-saving technologies (Output 4.3) in pilot sites.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring and evaluation for community-based adaptation is a new field, and the CBA project is piloting innovative approaches to evaluating the success of locally-driven adaptation projects, and generating lessons to inform ongoing practice.

Key considerations in M&E for CBA include:

  • Grounding M&E in the local context: M&E for CBA should avoid overly rigid frameworks, recognizing community heterogeneity and maintaining local relevance
  • Capturing global lessons from local projects: CBA projects are highly contextualized, but lessons generated should be relevant to stakeholders globally
  • Incorporation of both quantitative and qualitative indicators: to ground projects in tangible changes that can be objectively evaluated, and to capture lessons and case studies for global dissemination

To these ends, the CBA project uses three indicator systems: the Vulnerability Reduction Assessment, the Small Grants Programme Impact Assessment System, and the UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework.

The Vulnerability Reduction Assessment (VRA)

The VRA is a question-based approach with the following aims:

  • To make M&E responsive to community priorities
  • To use M&E to make projects more accountable to local priorities
  • To make M&E capture community ideas and local knowledge
  • To gather community-level feedback to guide ongoing project management
  • To generate qualitative information
  • To capture lessons on specific issues within community-based adaptation
  • To generate case studies highlighting adaptation projects

The VRA follows UNDP's Adaptation Policy Framework, and is measured in a series of meetings with local community stakeholders. In these meetings, locally-tailored questions based on standard VRA questions/indicators are posed, and the community assigns a numerical score on a 1-10 scale for each question. Progress is evaluated through changes in scores over the course of implementation, as well as through qualitative data collected in community discussions surrounding the exercise.

UNDP has developed a Users Guide to the VRA (Espanol) (Francais) as a tool to assist practitioners to conceptualize and execute VRA measurements in the context of CBA projects.

The SGP Impact Assessment System (IAS)

The CBA, being a project of the GEF Strategic Priority on Adaptation, aims to increase the resilience of ecosystems and communities to the impacts of climate change, generating global environmental benefits, and increasing their resilience in the face of climate change impacts. To this end, the CBA projects use the SGP's impact assessment system for monitoring achievements in GEF focal areas (focusing primarily on biodiversity and sustainable land management).

The IAS is composed of a number of quantitative indicators which track biophysical ecosystem indicators, as well as policy impact, capacity development and awareness-building.

UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework

CBA projects also track quantitative indicators from UNDP's adaptation indicator framework, corresponding to the thematic area on natural resources management. More information on UNDP's indicator framework can be found on the UNDP climate change adaptation monitoring and evaluation website.

 

This description applies to all projects implemented through UNDP's Community-Based Adaptation programme. Specific details on this project's M&E will be included here as they become available. *

Contacts: 
UNDP
CBA Project Management Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SPA
Project Status: