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Supporting Armenia to advance their NAP process

Country background, Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Agreement

Armenia is a small landlocked country in the Caucasus region with a mostly mountainous terrain, fast flowing rivers and few forests. Its highland continental climate means it is subject to hot summers and cold winters. Agriculture is a core sector in Armenia, employing 44 percent of the working population, although its contribution to the economy is on the decline, with the services and industrial sectors growing instead. Climate change is already affecting Armenia, with an annual mean temperature increase of 1.03 °C and decrease in precipitation of 10 percent recorded during the period 1935 – 2012. Extreme weather events, including heavy rainfall and hailstorms, are increasing in frequency, and desertification and land degradation are set to worsen. Agricultural lands cover 69 percent of the territory and 80 percent of these lands are already being affected by climate change impacts, with decreasing crop yields projected in the future.
 
Although Armenia is in the final stages of transitioning from a semi-presidential system to a parliamentary republic, it has developed an institutional framework that can facilitate the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the goals of the Paris Agreement. The Strategic Program of Prospective Development 2014-2025, the overarching development strategy, mentions the limitations that climate change will pose to economic growth. More specifically, the National Strategy on Disaster Risk Management (2017) integrates climate change and incorporates SDGs. 
 
These policies and strategies take a strong focus on mitigation, however, in Armenia’s INDC, which later became their First NDC, as they ratified the Paris Agreement in 2017, adaptation is given more weight. The NDC prioritises the following sectors as those most vulnerable to climate change and in need of adaptation interventions: natural ecosystems; human health; water resource management; agriculture, including fisheries and forests; energy; human settlements and infrastructure; and tourism. It identifies the foundation of its adaptation strategy to be the application of “an ecosystem-based approach to mitigation and adaptation actions, giving preference to balanced and combined actions”. Another key document, that reflects on the consequences of climate change scenarios, is the Third National Communication to the UNFCCC, submitted in 2015. The Fourth communication will be developed in 2019.
 

How has the NAP-GSP supported to date?

 

Conducted a mission to Armenia

 

Between 7 – 9 December, 2016, the NAP-GSP undertook a preliminary mission to identify Armenia’s strategic priorities regarding the NAP process. Through a stakeholder roundtable, qualitative interviews and extensive desk research, an assessment of relevant initiatives on climate mainstreaming and of the institutional framework and capacities relevant to the NAP process were conducted.

 

Production of a Stocktaking Report

 
Informed by the mission and the consultations with key stakeholders, a Stocktaking Report was produced. The report identified the most pressing weaknesses regarding climate change related risks and adaptation to be: (i) a lack of clear processes for updating risk information and for prioritising adaptation measures; (ii) a lack of awareness and capacity of sector ministries in terms of climate change and adaptation; and (iii) a lack of integration of climate-induced risks and adaptation into planning processes. The Stocktaking Report includes a roadmap for the NAP process to address these gaps.
Helped build capacity and  facilitated access to additional climate finance
 

 

Armenia submitted their Readiness and Preparatory Support Proposal to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) in February 2016, and was one of the first countries to request GCF support for their NAP process. Click for details on the approved project - National Adaptation Plan (NAP) to advance medium and long-term adaptation planning in Armenia.

 

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Funding Source: 

Project Brief / Fact Sheet

National Adaptation Plans in focus: Lessons from Armenia

Location: 
Display Photo: 
Project Dates: 
2018
Timeline: 
Month-Year: 
Sep 2015
Description: 
Armenia submits thier Intend Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) to the Paris Agreement
Month-Year: 
Jun 2016
Description: 
Government delegation from Armenia attends the NAP-GSP Eastern European, Caucasus and Central Asia Regional Workshop, Chisinau, Moldova
Month-Year: 
Dec 2016
Description: 
A stakeholder roundtable is held to identify the strategic priorities for Armenia’s NAP process
Month-Year: 
Dec 2016
Description: 
A Government Decree requests that a Concept of Ecosystem Approach to Climate Change Adaptation, and a NAP, are developed and submitted to government for approval
Month-Year: 
Dec 2016
Description: 
Armenia begins drafting a Readiness proposal to submit to the GCF for potential funding to support the NAP process
Month-Year: 
Feb 2016
Description: 
A Stocktaking Report and a preliminary roadmap for advancing the NAP process in Armenia is developed
Month-Year: 
Feb 2016
Description: 
The Readiness and Preparatory Support Proposal is submitted to the GCF
Month-Year: 
Mar 2017
Description: 
Armenia ratifies the Paris Agreement

Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project

Under the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project (TCAP) the Government of Tuvalu is implementing measures to reduce the impacts of climate-induced sea level rise and intensifying storm events on key infrastructure.

Building on existing initiatives, and using a range of measures for coastal protection - including eco-system initiatives, beach nourishment, concrete and rock revetments, and sea walls - the project focuses on building coastal resilience in three of Tuvalu’s nine inhabited islands. A total of 2,780m of high-value vulnerable coastline, with houses, schools and hospitals, will be protected from increasingly intensive wave action and coastal inundation. Building national capacity for resilient coastal management is also a key focus of the seven-year project, set to be completed in May 2024.

It is expected that the project will help to catalyse additional coastal adaptation finance from other donors.

Visit the project website https://tcap.tv

 

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (173.84765619275 -5.6105189170041)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The project will benefit about 3,100 people directly and about 3,499 indirect beneficiaries. This is about 62% of the population of Tuvalu. The project can potentially reduce annual losses (including statistical value of life) worth up to up to $667,000 over 40-year time period (period of analysis for the economic analysis)
Funding Source: 

PIFs

Timetable of project implementation

Evaluation Report of the Baseline Projects

Environmental and Social Management Plan

Environmental and Social Impact Assessment

Project Location Map

Financing Amount: 
US$36 million (Green Climate Fund)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$2.9 million (Government of Tuvalu)
Project Details: 

 

Tuvalu is the fourth smallest nation in the world, comprising nine inhabited islands with a population of 10,640. With an average elevation of only 1.83 meters, it is one of the most vulnerable countries in the world to the impacts of climate change. The combination of two manifestations of climate change – continually intensifying cyclone events and sea level rise – threaten to have dire impacts on Tuvalu. In 2015 Cyclone Pam displaced 45% of the population. The purpose of this project is to reduce the impact of increasingly intensive wave activity, through the compounding effects of sea-level rise and intensifying storm events, that is amplifying coastal inundation and erosion. It is evident and well accepted that the effects of climate change will only worsen coastal inundation and erosion in Tuvalu. This project will increase the coverage of coastal protection from the baseline 570m to 2,780m benefiting nearly 29% of the entire population. Investments on coastal protection are directed at coastlines in three islands (Funafuti, Nanumea and Nanumaga) along areas that have a high concentration of houses, schools, hospitals and other social and economic assets (henceforth referred to as “high-value” coastline).

Despite the extreme level of vulnerability, Tuvalu currently does not have a single engineered coastal protection infrastructure project that is designed to withstand current and future impacts of sea-level rise and intensifying tropical storms. The only exceptions are two interventions that are currently being designed for a length of 570 m in Funafuti and Nukufetau. The combined factors of high upfront investments required for coastal protection, the public good and non-revenue nature of the required solutions, and the inability of the Government to service loans, have permitted the Government and the community to implement the recognized solutions only at a slow pace and in a highly fragmented manner in the past. Because available resources are generally far smaller than what is required for implementing appropriate response measures, the past initiatives have often resorted to community-scale interventions that hardly withstand the current wave energy, let alone integrating climate change risks into the design. Without support, this sub-optimal practice is likely to continue for the foreseeable future. This project is proposed so that Tuvalu can, finally, take comprehensive and systemic steps to manage coastal inundation risks.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Strengthening of institutions, human resources, awareness and knowledge for resilient coastal management.

  • Technical capacity, knowledge and awareness strengthened for monitoring, protection and maintenance of coastal protection infrastructure.

    The jurisdiction of coastal protection is shared across the Department of Lands and Survey (DoLS), Public Works Department (PWD) and Department of Environment (DoE). However, none of these departments currently have the technical capacity to monitor the dynamic processes of coastal change over time nor the capacity to design potential coastal interventions. Nor is there sufficient capacity within the Climate Change Policy Unit (CCPU) to coordinate the work of these departments for effective coastal protection. Due to this limitation, the Government is not able to carry out vulnerability assessments, site assessments and coastal design, make informed decisions about pragmatic solutions for coastal protection, and identify potential funding sources for implementation. Instead, they generally have to wait for a donor, often with particular areas of financing priority, to approach them. This lack of ability to carry out a preliminary technical assessment contributes to an increasing sense that the issue is out of their control and eventually to limited ownership. Further, although the CCPU was newly established in 2015 to coordinate government’s actions for climate change adaptation and mitigation, medium- to long-term capacity building efforts are needed in the technical areas of climate change, coordination, project design and management, financial management, knowledge management and reporting.

  • Long-term national human resource capacity and awareness enhanced for sustainable coastal protection

    In the specific context of Tuvalu, the capacity building support conventionally delivered in donor-supported projects has been insufficient to establish a foundation for sustainability. This is because typically the capacity building support in these projects is exclusively targeting the existing government staff, which is small in number, and the progress is immediately undone if the staff members leave the government system. This approach to capacity building represents numerous missed opportunities for transforming the country. Climate change adaptation is defined by UNFCCC as a series of “adjustments in ecological, social, or economic systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli and their effects or impacts” and by nature, it is an iterative, long-term process. Adaptation efforts in SIDS like Tuvalu must embrace, in their core principle, a strategy to build capacity of the entire country that goes well beyond that of the government system.

Output 2: Vulnerability of key coastal infrastructure including homes, schools, hospitals and other assets is reduced against wave induced damage.

  • Coastal protection design, site-specific assessments and ESIA undertaken in all islands in a participatory manner

    A detailed, participatory design and site-specific assessment will be carried out in all the islands in Tuvalu. This process is needed not only to make final adjustments in the design of the coastal protection measures (such as the angle of the structure and protection of the toe of the structure) to maximize the effectiveness and longevity of the structure for the three targeted islands, but also to equip the other, non-targeted islands, with the necessary information for attracting donor resources in the future, including from GCF. The multi-stakeholder, gender-responsive planning and design process will take place to ensure that beneficiaries are fully informed and are able to contribute to the detail design and functionality of the coastal protection measures in each of the islands. The process will, for example, look into how the target community (men, women, youth, and elderly) interacts with the ocean and coastline, which is an important design element of coastal protection infrastructure. The assessment will result in a set of adaptation options, detailed technical drawings, bill of quantity, tender documents and detailed costing of the interventions. As described earlier, this process will be used as an opportunity to provide hands-on trainings for government staff from the DLS, PWD and DoE.

    Resources will be used to put in place a robust coastal protection infrastructure along 2,210m of vulnerable coastlines of Funafuti, Nanumea and Nanumaga to defend high value assets of the targeted islands. This translates to targeting nearly 28% of the high value zone of the country, which currently has no protective measures. Also this represents 10% of all vulnerable coastlines in the country. The design criteria are set such that the design will reflect the projected sea level rise and notional 200-year return period storm surge events. Geo-textile container revetments in Nanumea and Nanumaga will have minimum design life of 25 years; but, with the appropriate selection of vandal resistant bags for the top layer walls and, training of PWD and community members for monitoring and simple repair, the life expectancy is expected to be longer.

Output 3: A sustainable financing mechanism established for long-term adaptation efforts.

  • All Island Strategic Plans and annual budgets integrate island-specific climate risks through gender sensitive, participatory processes

    Successful climate risk mainstreaming into ISPs and effective use of available domestic financing will facilitate island-led actions, enhance planned and autonomous adaptation, and ultimately, increase resilience at the island level. In the context of coastal interventions envisaged in the GCF project, a strengthened ISP process will improve longer-term impact and replication potential of the GCF investments as domestic resources, allocated through ISPs, are expected to be used to maintain the GCF investments and to expand the coastal protection coverage. For the expansion of coastal protection measures beyond donor-assisted projects, lower-cost ecosystem-based approaches are a more realistic option given the limited available finance domestically. This activity will strengthen the critical foundation to facilitate this process.

  • Capacity of Kaupules, Falekaupules and community members strengthened for monitoring coastal adaptation investments

    This project will also be used to strengthen the capacity of both outer island administrations and community members for monitoring, reporting and verifying the progress of adaptation investments as an integral element of ISP support. Due to the special geographical condition of Tuvalu where islands are several days away from the central government, upward accountability to the central government and downward accountability to citizens can easily be diluted among kaupules. Thus, nurturing the sense of oversight among community members becomes critical for ensuring transparent, sustainable, demand-driven service delivery. Support to ISP formulation, budgeting and execution, the focus of Activity 3.1, and support for community members for an independent oversight of the ISP process, the focus of Activity 3.2, must go hand-in-hand. At the same time, outer island administrations also need to develop their capacity to report the use of resources and progress of investments to their constituents.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 


Contacts: 
UNDP
Yasuke Taishi
Mr
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


News and Updates: 

Funding Proposal approved by Green Climate Fund Board: 30 June 2016
Local Project Appraisal Committee meeting (LPAC): 15 February 2017
Funded Activity Agreement (FAA) effectiveness reached: 7 June 2017
Project Document signature between UNDP and Government: 14 June 2017
First disbursement received: 11 July 2017
Launch and inception workshop with key stakeholders: 30 August 2017

'Youths are the future of climate resilience', Fiji Times, February 11, 2018. As well as addressing the impacts and causes of climate change, we need to look to the solutions. How are communities going to, not just adapt, but build their resilience? What does resilience even mean? And how do we do it?  One of the keys to building it, and addressing the impacts of climate change, is ensuring countries themselves are leading in both developing and implementing the solutions. 

'Tuvalu scholarships awarded (under Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project)', Radio New Zealand, February 8, 2018. Two students from Tuvalu have been granted university scholarships under the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project. Investing in young people is among the country's environmental adaptation plans. Moeo Finauga said the students would be offered jobs on the project once they had completed their studies.

'Shoring up Tuvalu's Climate Resilience', UNDP Asia Pacific blog, August 30 2017. As the Tuvalu Coastal Adapation Project launches, celebration in Funafuti. Regional Technical Advisor, Yusuke Taishi, shares his thoughts on the occasion.

'Tuvalu’s climate resilience shored up with launch of US$38.9 million adaptation project', UNDP Pacific, August 30, 2017. The Prime Minister of Tuvalu along with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) officially launch the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project (TCAP) marking the start of an ambitious, large-scale push to protect the Pacific island nation from climate change.

'Tuvalu signs financing agreement to access Climate Fund' - Tuvalu Government, July 5 2017. Tuvalu has become the first Pacific Island country to sign the Financing Framework Agreement to access funds for coastal protection activities from the Green Climate Fund. The elated Prime Minister said the financing agreement, worth almost US$39 million will fund the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project on the three islands of Nanumea, Nanumaga and Funafuti. The process will begin in August with a workshop where Tuvalu Government and UNDP will coordinate logistics.  

'Government of Tuvalu launches new coastal protection project to bolster resilience to climate change' - UNDP, July 6, 2017. A signing ceremony took place in Suva on 14 June between the Tuvalu Prime Minister Enele Sopoaga and UNDP Resident Representative Osnat Lubrani. “The protection of our country’s vulnerable coastlines is an urgent priority of the Government of Tuvalu,” said the Prime Minister of Tuvalu, Hon. Enele Sosene Sopoaga.

'Green Climate Fund finance allocation builds Tuvalu’s resilience' - Green Climate Fund, July 3, 2017. The Green Climate Fund is transferring funds to help strengthen the island nation of Tuvalu against the double climate threats of rising sea levels and destructive cyclones. GCF is sending the first USD 2 million tranche of its USD 36 million contribution.

Information in French / Informations en français: 


Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
The purpose of this project is to reduce the impact of increasingly intensive wave activity, through the compounding effects of sea-level rise and intensifying storm events, that is amplifying coastal inundation and erosion. It is evident and well accepted that the effects of climate change will only worsen coastal inundation and erosion in Tuvalu. This projectt will increase the coverage of coastal protection from the baseline 570m to 2,780m benefiting nearly 29% of the entire population. Investments on coastal protection are directed at coastlines in three islands (Funafuti, Nanumea and Nanumaga) along areas that have a high concentration of houses, schools, hospitals and other social and economic assets (henceforth referred to as “high-value” coastline).
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: Strengthening of institutions, human resources, awareness and knowledge for resilient coastal management.

Output 2: Vulnerability of key coastal infrastructure including homes, schools, hospitals and other assets is reduced against wave induced damage.

Output 3: A sustainable financing mechanism established for long-term adaptation efforts.

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2024
Civil Society Engagement: 


Integrating Rio Convention Provisions into Ukraine’s National Environmental Policy Framework

Some of the challenges plaguing the implementation of Rio conventions in Ukraine are –
• Global environmental action plans are not mainstreamed into national and regional policy planning.
• Non inclusion of environmental conventions and integrated resource management at regional and local levels.
• Integration of the Rio Conventions into the national natural resource management legal frameworks is lacking .

In order to address the above, as well as a national sustainable development strategy, this UNDP-supported, GEF Trust project, Integrating Rio Convention Provisions into Ukraine’s National Environmental Policy Framework, aims to develops organizational and systematic capacity to develop implement and operationalize policy.
 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (30.5859374916 50.3594803494)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources, Government of Ukraine
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$990,000 (As of 20 June 2012, detailed in PIF)

PIFs

Ukraine – GEF Trust Project Identification Form (20 June 2012)

Co-Financing Total: 
$2,100,000 (As of 20 June 2012, detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has three main components with the following associated outcomes –

  1. Policy and institutional framework – this component includes updated institutional assessment covering responsibilities related to implementing Rio Conventions (Outcput 1.1) and the development of a Sustainable Development Strategy for Ukraine (SDSU) (Output 1.2).
  2. National Capacity to mainstream the Rio Conventions and to implement the SDSU including  a proposal for creating the Sustainable Development Agency in Ukraine (Output 2.1); development of a manual on integrating Rio Convention provisions into policy and economic sectoral planning processes (Output 2.2) and; identifying a cadre of trained personel at national and local level (Output 2.3).
  3. Public awareness at local level including public awareness on the impact of global environmental threats on local welfare (Output 3.1) and; public advocacy linking Rio conventions to local level planning and budget allocation processes (Output 3.2).

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Mainstreaming Global Environment Commitments for Effective National Environmental Management in Suriname

Presently there is poor communication amongst ministries and the system for accounting towards meeting the commitments under the conventions is weak. Coupled with low levels of awareness, knowledge and skills among decision-makers, Suriname is struggling to effectively fulfill its obligations towards the 3 Rio Conventions. With the aim of creating a steady platform for effective and efficient political dialogue and cross-institutional alliances, this UNDP-supported, GEF Trust funded project, Mainstreaming Global Environment Commitments for Effective National Environmental Management in Suriname, will work to strengthen the national environmental management at all levels.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-55.7226562693 4.41213681023)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Ministry of Labour, Technological Development and Environment, Government of Suriname
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$1,078,000 (As of 29 August 2012, detailed in PIF)

PIFs

Co-Financing Total: 
$900,000 (As of 29 August 2012, detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has two main components with the following associated outcomes –

  1. Generation of access and use of information through  improved decision-support mechanisms and the development of an environmental information and knowlege platform by targetting the ability of institutions and stakeholders to manage information for better environmental planning and processes (Outcome 1.1) and ; increasing the ability of stakeholders to diagnose, understand and transform information into local actions (Outcome 1.2)
  2. Creating and enhancing capacities for management and implementation on convention guidelines including the strengthening of the existing structures and coordination mechanisms to institutionalize coordination across agencies and other relevant  actors  (Outcome 2.1); negotiations of financial commitments to finance the delivery of global environmental outcomes (Outcome 2.2) and; improve the effectiveness of institutions and enhance the functioning of the political, economic, and social system (Outcome 2.3).
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Integrating global environment commitments in investment and development decision-making in the Solomon Islands

Solomon Island’s customary land tenure system has had the unintended consequence of creating significant negative environmental impacts. This, together with high population growth, uncontrolled large scale forest logging, displacement of traditional land and resource management systems has had adverse effects on the country's forest resources that cover about 85% of the land area.

The goal of this project, Integrating global environment commitments in investment and development decision-making in the Solomon Islands, is to deliver global environmental benefits across the three Rio Conventions through reduced deforestation and forest degradation by strengthening policy coordination and planning mechanisms.
 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (159.982910114 -9.46531730497)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster management and Meteorology, Government of Solomon Islands
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$935,000 (As of 9 November 2012 detailed in PIF)
Co-Financing Total: 
$1,317,000 (As of 9 November 2012 detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

There are two major components with the following outcomes of this project –

Institutional Capacity Development through strengthened institutional capacity and coordination to ensure cost-effective implementation of the Rio Conventions (Outcome 1.1); Mainstreamed global environmental priorities through the integration of the National Environmental and Capacity Development Action Plan (NECDAP) into the REDD+ Roadmap (Outcome 1.2) and; Securing global environmental priorities by strengthening linkages between the national strategies of the Rio Conventions and REDD+ social and environmental safeguards (Outcome 1.3).

Knowledge sharing through strengthened management information system to improve monitoring and performance of global environmental targets (Outcome 2.1) and; Raising targeted awareness to strengthen the commitment to meet national sustainable development and global environmental benefits (Output 2.2).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Display Photo: 

Integrating Global Environmental Priorities into National Policies and Programmes in Kiribati

Over the years, the government of Kiribati has demonstrated its commitment to the global environmental agenda as it struggles to address national issues and priorities.  Kiribati has developed a number of national environment strategies and plans that address its obligations under various MEAs. However, there exist gaps in national environmental policies and legislation, training, education, and public awareness as well as coordination among government agencies key for effective implementation of the Rio conventions.

With its focus on strengthening Kiribati's environmental management information system (EMIS), this UNDP-supported project, Integrating Global Environmental Priorities into National Policies and Programmes in Kiribati, will address the challenges of improving and enforcing environmental policies and legislation and help integrate environmental issues into national and sector strategies and plans among other goals. 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-157.212295583 1.74140823521)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Ministry of Environment, Land and Agricultural Development, Government of Kiribati
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$547,000

PIFs

Kiribati – GEF Trust Project Identification Form

Co-Financing Total: 
$530,000
Project Details: 

More Information to come...

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The two major outcomes of this project are –

  1. The development of an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) including a SWOT and Gap analyses of existing databases and management information systems (Outcome 1.1); Formulation of benchmarks central for data generation (Outcome 1.2); Formulation of a strategic plan for institutional reforms to create an EMIS (Outcome 1.3); Identification and training on the use of new and improved tools and technologies for collecting and managing harmonized environmental data/information (Outcome 1.4) and; Launch of a public awareness campaign on the value and need for an EMIS (Outcome 1.5)
  2. The development of an Environmental Indicators and Compliance Monitoring System (CMS) including creation of harmonized environmental indicators (Outcome 2.1); Establishing best practice methodologies and training on the application of environmental indicators (Outcome 2.2); Development of software and information technology to track environmental indicators (Outcome 2.3); Development of the CMS in a structured manner to track environmental indicators (Outcome 2.4) and; Institutionalization of the CMS within planning and decision-making authorities at the technical and ministerial levels (Outcome 2.5).
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

More Information to come...

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

More Information to come...

Display Photo: 

Strengthening the Capacity to Implement Natural Resources Legislation in Lao People’s Democratic Republic

While systemic capacities that support the implementation and enforcement of existing laws and regulations in the country are strong in terms of legislative framework, the lack of local individual capacities in terms of knowledge, skills, experience and institutional support remain a major impediment. In direct response to these issues, this project, Strengthening the Capacity to Implement Natural Resources Legislation in Lao People’s Democratic Republic, will strengthen capacity to implement natural resources legislation to meet the primary obligations of the Rio Conventions in Lao PDR.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
GEOMETRYCOLLECTION (POINT (102.579345663 18.6514499279), POINT (102.645263632 18.2136982498), POINT (102.53540035 18.1719497135), POINT (102.601318312 18.7138944969), POINT (102.601318312 18.7138944969), POINT (102.579345656 18.7971180534), POINT (102.491455031 18.0466442656), POINT (102.645263625 18.7555114061))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources and the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$500,000

Training & Tools

Reports and Publications by country teams

Lao PDR – GEF Trust Project Terminal Report (3 August 2013)

Communications Products

ProDocs

Lao PDR – GEF Trust Project Document

Co-Financing Total: 
$603,317
Project Details: 

More Information to come...

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The following are the main outputs of the project –

  1. Key stakeholders in the three provinces are implementing and enforcing important components of the existing natural resource management legislation. This will be achieved through an agreed set of priority laws, regulations and/or articles (Outcome 1.1); A compliance strategy consisting of a set of steps to be taken to increase local compliance with the law (Outcome 1.2); A package of operational tools to help enforce the laws (Outcome 1.3) and; Documentation of the impacts of the tools on compliance across the Project Site (Outcome 1.4)
  2. National level stakeholders have the capacity to implement and enforce natural resource legislation. This will be achieved through an agreed set of priority laws, regulations and/or articles, that are best addressed at the national level (Outcome 2.1); A compliance strategy consisting of a set of steps to be taken at the national level to increase compliance with the laws selected under 2.1 and to be implemented at the national level (Outcome 2.2); A package of operational tools to help enforce the laws (Outcome 2.3) and; Documentation of the impacts of the tools on compliance across the Project Site (Outcome 2.4).
  3. Legislation and policy with regards to the Rio Conventions in Lao PDR is made more suitable to the national situation. This will be achieved through legislative revision that will take into account the primary and secondary obligations to UNCBD, UNFCCC and UNCCD (Outcome 3.1) and; Feeding in the findings, experience and lessons learnt from the Provinces under Outcome 3.1 into the legislative process and into laws and regulations (Outcome 3.2).
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

More Information to come...

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

More Information to come...

Display Photo: 

Generating Global Environmental Benefits from Improved Local Planning and Decision-making Systems in Burkina Faso

The project aims to address the inherent complexity and challenges that development institutions face when addressing global environmental issues. It aims to catalyze the mainstreaming of multi-lateral environmental agreements into development paths and processes in Burkina Faso by addressing key capacity gaps.  This is to be achieved by strengthening information management systems and by providing capacity development support to local planning and development processes.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-0.351562521361 12.9189065945)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$1,067,000

PIFs

Burkina Faso – CCCD Project Identification Form

Co-Financing Total: 
$4,191,000
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project outcomes are as follows –

  1. Functioning, sustainable system for collecting, analyzing, storing and making available accurate and reliable data related to all three Rio Conventions – this will be achieved through the design of the data/information management system (Outcome 1.1); Improved protocols and standards for data collection (Outcome 1.2); The Environmental Observatory technically and materially strengthened to provide a coordinated and sustainable information collection and storage mechanism (Outcome 1.3) and; Collection of a set of cross-cutting global environment knowledge materials covering all three Conventions (Outcome 1.4)
  1. Enhanced institutional capacities to plan and implement development processes that contribute to implementing the Rio Convention – through development of a manual with guidelines on mainstreaming biodiversity, climate change, desertification, disaster management and wetlands management into key development planning and processes (Outcome 2.1); Training a large cadre of experts on the use of such a manual (Outcome 2.2); Practical application of the manual and guidelines to modify development programmes (Outcome 2.3); Global environmental benefits accruing from the implementation of the modified plans (Outcome 2.4) and; Legislation to formalize use of the Manual and guideline (Outcome 2.5)

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Integrating Climate Change Risks into the Agriculture and Health Sectors in Samoa

Increasing evidence of climate change-induced risks confronts the Samoan community with serious livelihood challenges, especially in the agriculture and health sectors. The increasing frequency and length of extreme climatic events have adversely impacted on agricultural production, which has led to loss of crops and soil erosion. Along with agricultural vulnerability, there are growing concerns about climate related vector-borne, food-borne and water-borne diseases.

This project, Integrating Climate Change Risks in the Agriculture and Health Sectors (ICCRA&HS), has set specific goals to reduce climate change-induced risks in the Samoan community in these key development sectors.

Supported by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the project is working to safeguard human development in Samoa from the risks associated with climate change. Efforts are also being made to enhance national, sub-national, and local capacities of government authorities, public health workers and planners to understand climate risk dynamics. In short, the project is focusing on the resilience and adaptive capacity of Samoan coastal communities to climate change impacts on agricultural production and public health. Project outcomes include enhancing the technical capabilities of the Samoa Meteorological Division, improving Samoa’s capacity to perform short-term and long-term agricultural planning, and strengthening Samoa's capacity in public health. To ensure that lessons and knowledge gained from this project can be shared and successes replicated, information will be disseminated through UNDP’s Adaptation Learning Mechanism.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-172.133795171 -13.7392191311)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Coastal communities of Samoa
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$2,050,000

PIFs

Samoa NAPA LDCF PIF 3 May 2007

Case Study

UNDP-ALM Case Study for Samoa, October 2011

ProDocs

3940 Samoa Project Document - 18 November 2008

Co-Financing Total: 
$2,100,000
Project Details: 

The Integrating Climate Change Risks in the Agriculture and Health Sectors (ICCRA&HS) project will help the Government of Samoa develop an integrated approach to address climate change impacts through adaptive actions. The project’s main components aim to both further understand the effects of climate change in the agriculture and health sectors in Samoa, and to inform future adaptation planning and actions.

These goals will be accomplished by:

  • Collecting and exchanging climate data between sector professionals and regional climate observation networks;
  • Obtaining an estimate of the damage to Samoan population and economy of climate change related risks in the agriculture and health sectors. This will help quantify the benefits of adaptation measures;
  • Identifying and evaluating alternative adaptation measures applicable to Samoa;
  • Revising agricultural management plans and strategies, national soil and crop maps, and public health plans;
  • Providing the Samoan authorities and institutions with an effective tool to estimate the future potential damage to crops and farms and to plan future adaptation investments based on different risk scenarios;
  • Craft an early warning system to prevent significant damage to the agriculture and health sectors
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The goal of the project is to safeguard human development in Samoa from new and additional risks associated with climate change.The objective of the project is to increase the resilience and adaptive capacity of coastal communities in Samoa to the adverse impacts of on agricultural production and public health.

OUTCOME 1: Enhanced technical and organizational capabilities of the Samoa Meteorological Division (MD) to monitor and provide information on climate change risks and early warning communications to the agricultural and health sectors and augment existing Disaster Risk Management processes

  • Output 1.1 – Automated processing of climate data in MD established for more effective analysis and dissemination of climate risk information with relevant MD staff training

OUTCOME 2: Capacity of Samoa’s agricultural sector improved to design adaptive policies and perform short-term (seasonal) and long-term (decadal) agricultural planning and crop management

  • Output 2.1 – Agricultural management plans and strategies are revised to incorporate climate risk forecasting and adaptive planning
  • Output 2.2 – National soil and crop maps updated and enhanced with functionalities for climate risk and productivity modeling under different climate conditions
  • Output 2.3 – Adaptive agricultural crop management piloted in vulnerable agricultural areas

OUTCOME 3: Capacity of Samoa’s public health planners and public health workers strengthened to reduce the impact of climate change on public health

  • Output 3.1 – Information system for climate-related disease data collection, storage and analysis established
  • Output 3.2 – Public Health plans and strategies are revised to incorporate climate risk projections and adaptive planning
  • Output 3.3 – Public health (Health Protection) planners and workers trained in climate-related health risk monitoring and management
  • Output 3.4 – Rapid testing for climate-related diseases piloted in 3 high-risk areas
  • Output 3.5 – Reduction of climate-related diseases demonstrated in 3 high risk districts

OUTCOME 4: Enhanced learning, evaluation and adaptive management

  • Output 4.1 – Project lessons captured in, and disseminated through, the Adaptation Learning Mechanism
  • Output 4.2 – Project knowledge shared with other climate-sensitive sectors in Samoa

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 
  • Summary of the relevant baseline development plans and investment programmes of the public, private and NGO sector in Samoa focusing on relevant activities as they pertain to climate change risk management in the sectors of intervention through the proposed UNDP-GEF intervention;
  • Review and summary of the existing policy and regulatory frameworks;
  • Review, analysis and summary of the past project related activities of other donors and private sector on adaptation in Samoa and an updated report on the co-operation and co-financing possibilities in the framework of the envisaged UNDP-GEF project;
  • Supporting reports prepared by techincal experts to justify the proposed project interventions and to leverage financing for the proposed activities (this may include pre-feasibility studies for pilots, draft business plans etc.)
  • A Project Logical Framework that captures UNDP endorsed indicators and verification strategies;
  • M&E framework for the project that will measure improvement in adaptive capacity to climate change including variability. This includes a list of proposed indicators and an associated monitoring and evaluation plan (with a clear definition of how these indicators would be measured and how verification data would be collected through the monitoring programme).
  • A work plan with detailed roles and responsibilities for implementation;
  • A stakeholder participation plan, with a clear focus on community involvement;
  • Endorsement letters from the government and letters confirming co-financing commitments;
  • Project Document as per GEF and UNDP requirements including completed UNDP checklist for preparing adaptation projects;
  • Lessons Learned from the prepararoty phase and; and
  • Other reports from all project relevant stakeholder consultations

 

Contacts: 
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment
Anne Rasmussen
Project Manager
UNDP
Gabor Vereczi
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Martha Moneo
CO Focal Point
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: 

Ecosystem Based Adaptation in Seychelles

This project seeks to reduce the vulnerability of the Seychelles to climate change, focusing on two key issues—water scarcity and flooding. Climate change projections in the Seychelles show that rainfall, while increasing in overall terms, will become even more irregular. Much of the precipitation is falling in sharp bursts, creating heavy flooding in the wet season, while imposing extended period of drought during the dry season. As the country does not have a large water storage capacity, and the topography of the islands constrains such infrastructure, water supplies are heavily dependent on rainfall. Furthermore, the coastal zone is vulnerable to flooding as a consequence of rising sea surface levels, and increased storm surges from cyclonic activity in the Western Indian Ocean. The project will reduce these vulnerabilities by spearheading ecosystem-based adaptation as climate change risk management—restoring ecosystem functionality, and enhancing ecosystem resilience and sustaining watershed and coastal processes in order to secure critical water provisioning and flood attenuation ecosystem services from watersheds and coastal areas.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((55.335382075 -4.62024706306, 55.4342590282 -4.54358854741, 55.6375060985 -4.73658785681, 55.5207763622 -4.83101483757, 55.335382075 -4.62024706306))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities in the targeted watersheds on the island of Mahé
Funding Source: 

PIFs

Seychelles AF Project Proposal

Financing Amount: 
$6,455,750 (amount requested and approved 2011-06-22)
Co-Financing Total: 
N/A
Project Details: 

The Seychelles is economically, culturally and environmentally vulnerable to the effects of climate change and associated extreme weather events. The effects of climate change are already noticeable in Seychelles and these effects and their associated impacts are projected to escalate in the future. The two biggest climate change vulnerabilities are water scarcity and coastal flooding.

Freshwater is crucial both for human needs (e.g. drinking and sanitation) as well as other sectoral uses that are intrinsic to the development process (e.g. tourism/agriculture). Although the country receives a relatively high average annual precipitation quotient of 2,200 mm of rainfall, the Seychelles is considered to be “water stressed”. The impacts of climate change on Seychelles‘ water resources are expected to be severe. The dry southeast monsoon season is expected to become drier and the period between rainfall events during this season is likely to become longer. This will have impacts on stream flow. The water storage capacity in Seychelles will be severely challenged as a consequence.

Ecosystems play an important role in determining the vulnerability of communities to climate change—particularly in Small Island Developing States such as the Seychelles. The forests and wetlands of the granitic islands play an important role in regulating stream flows and water quality. Forested land binds the soil, thereby decreasing soil erosion and increasing the capacity of soils to absorb and retain water. This allows water to penetrate deeper into the soil, allowing for less runoff and slower release. Wetlands and riparian vegetation also assist in reducing erosion slowing water discharge over a longer period of time. This will have two benefits in ameliorating the effects of climate change on water supplies - providing more regular stream flow during the lengthier dry season, and buffering against flooding following intense rainfall events. Similarly, mangroves and fringing coral reefs protect coastal land against coastal erosion, while coastal sand dunes and wetlands play an important role in controlling coastal flooding. These flood attenuation services are likely to be critical given projected climate change induced flooding risks.

The project will implement results-oriented ecosystem based adaptation measures centered on the issues and opportunities identified by local stakeholders. It will focus on the development and application of technological solutions and tools for resolving specific vulnerability issues as a result of climate change in the main granitic islands of Seychelles. In doing so, it will build on technologies that have been used in similar contexts, or successfully tested at a pilot scale in the Seychelles (e.g., forest rehabilitation). The overall approach is to work from the level of technical solutions at specific watershed/coastal sites to the policy and regulatory level, such that future replication of adaptation measures will be catalysed, supported by new policies, guidelines, and awareness of watershed stewardship. Communities will be increasingly climate resilient and able to protect water supply and livelihoods that are linked to the integrity of the watersheds and coastal ecosystems on the Granitic islands.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Component 1: Ecosystem-based adaptation approach to enhancing freshwater security

Finance technology development and application to restore riparian areas, including forests and wetlands (Output 1.1), and manage forest catchments to enhance climate change resilience, including integrated wildfire management (Output 1.2). Design and construct small-scale artificial raw water storage facilities in critical waterways (Output 1.3).

Component 2: Ecosystem-based adaptation approaches along the shorelines of the Granitic Islands

Restore and protect critical ecosystems, including mangrove forests, sand dunes, wetlands, and coral reefs through planting and removal of alien species (Output 2.1). Enhance adaptive capacity of vulnerable communities and resource users by establishing local-level bodies and training in Ecosystem-Based Adaptation methodologies (Output 2.2).

Component 3: Ecosystem based adaptation mainstreamed into development planning and financing

Mainstream EBA into land/water planning and regulation processes (Output 3.1) while creating/enhancing institutional mechanisms that internalize climate change risks into coastal zone management planning (Output 3.2). Capture and disseminate EBA applications (Output 3.3) and plan for up-scaling of best practices (Output 3.4).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) scheme will be applied in accordance with the established UNDP procedures throughout the project lifetime. As an implementing partner, MHAETE, together with the UNDP Mauritius/Seychelles will ensure the timeliness and quality of the project implementation. Technical guidance and oversight will be also provided from the UNDP‘s Regional Bureau for Southern Eastern Africa, as well as the Project Board (PB). Audits on the project will follow UNDP finance regulations and rules and applicable audit policies.

Project start: A Project Inception Workshop (IW) will be held within the first 3 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project management, AF, UNDP CO and where appropriate/feasible, regional technical advisors as well as other stakeholders. The IW is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan.

Annual Progress Report. An Annual Progress Report (APR) shall be prepared by the Project Manager, shared with the Project Board and submitted to the Donor. The APR will be prepared with progresses against set goals, objectives and targets, lessons learned, risk management and detailed financial disbursements.

Mid-term of the project cycle: The project will undergo an independent Mid-Term Evaluation (MTE) at the mid-point of project implementation (September 2015). The MTE will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed. It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management. The findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project‘s term.

Periodic Monitoring through site visits: UNDP Mauritius/Seychelles will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Annual Work Plan to assess, at first hand, project progress. Other members of the PB may also join these visits.

Project Closure: An independent Final Evaluation will be undertaken 3 months prior to the final PB meeting. The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project‘s results as initially planned and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction takes place. The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Johan Robinson
UNDP/GEF Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
AF
Project Status: 
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