Infrastructure/Climate Change Risk Management

Taxonomy Term List

Enhancing “whole of islands” Approach to Strengthen Community Resilience to Climate and Disaster risks in Kiribati

The United Nations Development Programme is working with the Government of Kiribati to develop a project proposal for a new US$9 million grant proposal for the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund. The proposed "Enhancing 'whole of islands' Approach to Strengthen Community Resilience to Climate and Disaster Risks in Kiribati" project will include US$45 million in co-financing. The project looks to strengthen the capacity of government institutions to support the operalization of the Kiribati Joint Implementation Plan for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management 2014-2023 (KJIP), enhance capacity of island administrations  to plan for and monitor climate change adaptation processes in a Whole of Islands (WoI) approach, and enhance community capacities  to adapt to climate induced risks to food and water security and community assets.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-160.66406254289 -1.5708480860501)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.9 million proposed GEF LDCF Grant
Co-Financing Total: 
US$45 million proposed co-financing
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes:

1.1 Capacities of national government institutions and personnels strengthened on mainstreaming climate and disaster risks, supporting the operalization of the Kiribati Joint Implementation Plan for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management 2014-2023 (KJIP)

2.1 Capacity of island administrations enhanced to plan for and monitor climate change adaptation processes in a Whole of Islands (WoI) approach

3.1 Community capacities enhanced to adapt to climate induced risks to food and water security and community assets

Expected Outputs:

1.1.1 National and sectoral level policy, planning and legal frameworks revised or developed, integrating climate change and disaster risks

1.1.2 Budgetary processes and related institutional structures adjusted with considerations to climate change risk

1.1.3 National and sectoral monitoring and evaluation (M&E) processes, related data gathering and communication systems enhanced and adjusted to support KJIP implementation

1.1.4 KJIP Coordination mechanism enhanced

1.1.5 Tools and mechanisms to develop, stock, and share data, knowledge, and information on climate change and disaster risks enhanced at the national level

2.2.1 Island and community level vulnerability and adaptation (V&A) assessments revised and/or developed at 5 additional islands

2.1.2 Island Council Strategic Plans reviewed and complemented with whole of island adaptation action plans in 5 islands

2.1.3 Island level M&E processes, related data gathering, and communications systems enhanced and adjusted linked with national systems

2.1.4 Tools and mechanisms to develop, stock, and share data, knowledge, and information on CC and DR enhanced at the island level – with the option of exploring the software and hardware to strengthen information and communication mechanisms for early warning system (EWS)

2.1.5 I Kiribati population in 5 islands receives formal and informal training and awareness raising programmes on climate change and disaster risk management

3.1.1 Climate-resilient agriculture and livestock practices (including supply, production and processing/storage aspects) are introduced in at least 5 additional islands and communities

3.1.2 Water supply and storage facilities enhanced and/or installed at 5 additional islands and communities

3.1.3 Shoreline protection and climate proofing of infrastructure measures implemented at 5 additional islands and communities

Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Capacities of national government institutions and personnels strengthened on mainstreaming climate and disaster risks, supporting the operalization of the Kiribati Joint Implementation Plan for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management 2014-2023 (KJIP).

Outcome 2 - Capacity of island administrations enhanced to plan for and monitor climate change adaptation processes in a Whole of Islands (WoI) approach.

Outcome 3 - Community capacities enhanced to adapt to climate induced risks to food and water security and community assets

Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience of the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa

As a Small Island Developing State in the Pacific, Samoa has been heavily impacted by increasing severe tropical storms. In response, the Government of Samoa has adopted a programmatic approach to address the issue of climate change-induced flooding .
 
As part of this programme, the Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience of the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa project will enable the Government to reduce the impact of recurrent flood-related impacts in the Vaisigano river catchment. The river flows through the Apia Urban Area (AUA), Samoa’s primary urban economic area.
 
The primary direct beneficiaries include approximately 26,528 people in the Vaisigano river catchment who will benefit from upgraded infrastructure and drainage downstream, integrated planning and capacity strengthening, including planning for flooding caused by extreme weather events, and flood mitigation measures especially riverworks and ecosystems solutions in the Vaisigano River Catchment. Overall, 37,000 people will also benefit indirectly. The economic net present value of the proposed investment project has been estimated to reach approximately US$15.6 million, and to yield an economic internal rate of return of approximately 15.5%. The project is expected to run from 2017-2023.
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-168.57421877011 -13.228535498555)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
26,528 people living in the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$65.7 million total. US$57.7 million from Green Climate Fund, US$8 million from Government of Samoa (as detailed in the ProDoc, Dec 2016)

Funded Activity Agreement - Samoa

ProDocs

GCF Funding Proposal

Project Details: 

GCF resources will be used to implement a combination of integrated watershed and flood management works including both hard and soft measures. This includes upgrading river works to cater to increased water flows during flood events (taking into account the likelihood of the increased frequency of extreme events), ensuring that infrastructure works, and home dwellings, government and private-sector buildings are made more secure and provide adequate shelter in case of floods and their aftermaths. Additionally, the project will ensure that when floodwaters occur, the excess waters are channeled away through an effective, efficient, and fit-for-purpose drainage system. The project will consequently play a critical role in assisting the urban population and economy to effectively manage the inevitable increased intensity and frequency of flooding.

Direct benefits from these interventions include reduced risk of damage to public and private infrastructure/assets; reduced possibility of loss of life; and enhanced land value in flood-prone areas. Indirect benefits include reduced losses in income/sales; reduced costs of clean-ups, maintenance and repairs; reduced costs of relief and response efforts; and reduced possibility of health hazards. In addition to these 26,000 direct beneficiaries, the general population of Samoa will benefit from the safeguarding of critical economic assets and learning that will be generated.

In addition, mid and upstream ecosystem and community-based adaptation measures will enhance capture, infiltration, storage and delayed release of rainwater in soils and biomass, and water retention ponds will serve both climate-smart agribusiness development and combat degradation of vulnerable ecosystems through appropriate agro-forestry land-use practices.

Addressing Climate Change in Samoa

Recent extreme events have resulted in approximately US$200 million worth of damages during each event. Climate projections for Samoa suggest that the risk of climate induced events will increase, potentially undermining development progress in urban Apia where the majority of the population and economic activity is located.

Given the topography of the country, extreme events result in significant river discharge that results in flooding of lowland areas. Recent tropical events such as Cyclone Evan have caused significant damage to both public and private assets as a result of flooding, resulting in serious health impacts. Urban infrastructure has suffered considerably from the recurrence of flooding and is unable to cope as climate change-related events are expected to become more frequent and intense.

Projected climate change scenarios cited by the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) suggest that Samoa is expected to have more frequent and extreme rainfall events; more frequent and longer drought events; increased air and water temperatures; sea level rise; and more frequent extreme wind events.

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project represents the Government of Samoa’s initial steps in operationalizing a comprehensive flood management solution for the likely consequences of extreme events in Apia, the capital with about 80,000 people. In this project, three interlinked project outputs will be pursued:

  • Capacities and information base strengthened for the Government of Samoa to pursue an integrated approach to reduce vulnerability towards flood-related risks;
  • Key infrastructure in the Vaisigano River Catchment are flood-proofed to increase resilience to negative effects of excessive water; and
  • Upgraded drainage in downstream areas to increase capacity and allow for more rapid outflow of flood waters.
Monitoring & Evaluation: 


Contacts: 
UNDP
Reis Lopez Rello
Regional Technical Specialist - Adaptation
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
gcf
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


News and Updates: 

Funding Proposal approved by Green Climate Fund Board: 14 December 2016
Funded Activity Agreement (FAA) effectiveness reached: 11 July 2017
Local Project Appraisal Committee meeting (LPAC): 4 July 2017
Project Document signature between UNDP and Government: 21 July 2017

First disbursement of funds: August 2017

'Samoa kicks off climate adaptation project to benefit 1 in 3 citizens facing flood risk' UNDP, October 25, 2017. In the lead up to COP climate talks in Bonn, the launch of a Green Climate Fund-financed US$65 million project signals strong global support for climate-resilient development in Small Island Developing States. 

'Green Climate Fund Samoa project launch and inception workshop' - UNDP Samoa, August 21, 2017. The Government of Samoa, through the Ministry of Finance, and the United Nations Development Program held joint events for the GCF-funded project, 'Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience for the Vaisigano River Catchment' . The workshop presented the work plan for the project and prioritized activities ahead.
 

'Every dollar counts in fight against climate change - New GCF Funding for Samoa' - Samoa Observer, December 16, 2016. Op-ed celebrating Somoa's recently approved US$58 million Green Climate Fund project.

'Director General hails meeting outcome' -  Samoa Observer, December 15, 2016. The Director General of the Vailima-based Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (S.P.R.E.P), Leota Kosi Latu, has hailed the outcome of Green Climate Fund Board meeting in Apia. With three multi-million projects proposed by Pacific...
 
 

YouTube

 

Learn more about the climate challenges facing Samoa, and how UNDP is working to address those challenges and reduce risks.

Information in French / Informations en français: 


Display Photo: 
Subtitle: 
Flood Management in Samoa
About (Summary): 
As a Small Island Developing State (SIDS) in the Pacific, Samoa has been heavily impacted by increasing severe tropical storms. In response, the Government of Samoa has adopted a programmatic approach to address the issue of climate change induced flooding in Samoa. As part of this programme, the Integrated Flood Management to Enhance Climate Resilience of the Vaisigano River Catchment in Samoa project will enable the Government of Samoa to reduce the impact of recurrent flood-related impacts in the Vaisigano river catchment. The river flows through the Apia Urban Area (AUA), Somoa’s primary urban economic area.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1. Strengthening capacities and mechanisms for integrated approach to reduce flood-related risks in place.

 

Output 2. Key infrastructure in the Vaisigano River Catchment are flood-proofed to increase resilience to negative effects of excessive water.

 
 
Output 3. Drainage in downstream areas upgraded for increased regulation of water flows.
 

 

Civil Society Engagement: 


Mainstreaming climate risks considerations in food security in Tsilima Plains and Upper Catchment Area

The Tsilima Region – part of the densely populated Central Highlands agro-ecological zone – is known for its agricultural products, such as sorghum and barley, it is considered the breadbasket of Eritrea, and is the focus of the government’s current and future investments in food security. Being densely populated, the region’s ecosystems and natural resources face increasing pressure. In addition to this, climate change poses an additional threat to ecosystem goods and services – and therefore agricultural productivity and community livelihoods – in this area. Like many parts of the Africa, Eritrea, being located in the Horn of Africa, is currently facing climate change-induced threats to ecosystem services and agricultural productivity, and these are compounded by the impacts of signicant land degradation occurring in the country. In the Tsilima Region, these problems manifest through reduced groundwater recharge, which affects agricultural productivity. This is partly a result of decreased precipitation, shorter and more intense rainy seasons, which reduce the potential for infiltration, promotes run-off, and increased temperatures that promote evapotranspiration. It is also a result of over-abstration of groundwater within short periods, reducing the opportunities for natural recharge of groundwater aquifers and deforestation, leading to reduced capacity of soils to retain moisture and nutrients.

The project’s objective is therefore to integrate adaptation measures into ecosystem management and restoration and agricultural production systems to secure the benefits of the National Food Security Strategy (NFSS) and Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) Action Plan. By doing so, the LDCF-financed project will support the implementation of Priorities 3, 4 and 5 of Eritrea’s National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) – which focus on livestock, forestry and water resources respectively. Furthermore, the project will mitigate the effects of floods and droughts, contribute to reduced soil erosion and increase soil fertility. Communities in the Tsilima Region will therefore be less vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The project will achieve this by enhancing the scientific and technical capacity of government staff – at national, Zoba and sub-Zoba levels – as well as academic and research institutions to identify, plan and implement climate change adaptation (CCA) interventions. This will facilitate the implementation of an ecosystem-based approach to CCA in sub-Zoba Dbarwa, in the Tsilima plains and upper catchments. The theory of change adopted for this LDCF-financed project comprises addressing the barriers discussed below and in Section II (Development Challenge) of the Project Document while contributing to the preferred solution discussed below through the delivery of three interrelated components.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (38.364257769704 15.681551506462)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
9,050,000
Co-Financing Total: 
27,500,000
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
1.1 Capacity of research institutions to undertake climate related research increased by over 50% as measured by changes in UNDP Capacity Scorecard.
 
1.2: Capacity of extension service institutions to provide knowledge based climate smart extension service to agriculture, livestock production and water management increased by over 50% as measured by changes in UNDP Capacity Scorecard: Collectively, outcome a and 2 above lead to: i) increased use of climate risk information in decisions related to the implementation of the IWRM action plans and increasing food production in ; ii) an improved score on the Vulnerability and risk perception index, disaggregated by gender (baselines at ppg); iii) Five comprehensive landscape adaptation plans formulated using the information generated under this component, complemented by community based resilience assessments.
 
2.1: Security of tenure improved for the communities of plains covering over 9000 hectares ( number of households and exact means of verification to be established during PPG);
 
2.2: By 2018, the amount of water available for irrigation increases by 30% over current baseline (of 28 million cubic meters) increasing the area under irrigation from 400ha to about 1000ha); baseline and target to be confirmed in PPG.
 
2.3: By 2018, more than 75% of farmers take up climate smart farming technologies and food production has increased by 30% , while livestock productivity increases by at least 30% (baseline determined at PPG); this leads i) over 75% of project beneficiaries have sufficient food and livestock products for most of the year; ii) an improved score on the “Vulnerability and risk perception index, disaggregated by gender”
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
News and Updates: 

Sowing the seeds of sustainability in Eritrea

In Eritrea, a small country in the Horn of Africa, land rehabilitation combats erosion and desertification, and helps restore agricultural productivity. The central highlands region of Eritrea, a densely populated agro-ecological zone, is largely considered as the ‘breadbasket’ of the country, and is the focus of the government’s current and future investments in food security. But the breadbasket has, over the years, been growing ever-emptier. Despite the relatively fertile soils, agricultural productivity had progressively declined as a result of increasing population pressure, unsustainable land and water use, and the effects of climate change (less rain, falling in shorter and more intense rainy seasons and resulting in increased run-off).

UNDP Medium
Monday 30 October 2017

 

Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
This project integrates adaptation measures into ecosystem management and restoration of agricultural production systems to secure the benefits of the National Food Security Strategy (NFSS) and Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) Action Plan. This will support Priorities 3, 4 and 5 of Eritrea's National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA), which focuses on livestock, forestry and water resources respectively.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1.1: Capacity of research institutions to undertake climate-related research increased.

Outcome 1.2: Capacity of extension service institutions to provide knowledge-based climate-smart extension services to agriculture, livestock production and water management increased.

Outcome 2.1: Climate-resilient land use planning implemented over 9,000 hectares of the Tsilima Region.

Outcome 2.2: Integrated water management operationalised across the Tsilima Region, increasing water availability and land under irrigation.

Outcome 2.3: Increased food production through the implementation of climate-smart agricultural practices across the Tsilima Region. 

Outcome 3.1: Increased monitoring, knowledge-sharing and awareness at Zoba, sub-Zoba, Kebabi and community levels on: i) climate change risks; ii) climate- and ecosystem-smart watershed restoration; iii) climate-smart agricultural technologies and measures; and iv) the sustainable use and management of natural resources.

Project Dates: 
2016 to 2022
Civil Society Engagement: 
  • Existing CBOs strengthened, including inter alia Village Agricultural Committees, Water User Associations and Farmer Associations to coordinate local level participation in climate change adaptation, land use and development planning.
  • Local communities and households trained to undertake sustainable water use and management, including inter alia water harvesting, construction and maintenance of hard and soft engineering interventions.
  • Public awareness-raising and education campaigns conducted in the Tsilima Region using all forms of media (including inter alia print, radio, art and drama)

Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project

Under the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project (TCAP) the Government of Tuvalu is implementing measures to reduce the impacts of climate-induced sea level rise and intensifying storm events on key infrastructure.

Building on existing initiatives, and using a range of measures for coastal protection - including eco-system initiatives, beach nourishment, concrete and rock revetments, and sea walls - the project focuses on building coastal resilience in three of Tuvalu’s nine inhabited islands. A total of 2,780m of high-value vulnerable coastline, with houses, schools and hospitals, will be protected from increasingly intensive wave action and coastal inundation. Building national capacity for resilient coastal management is also a key focus of the seven-year project, set to be completed in May 2024.

It is expected that the project will help to catalyse additional coastal adaptation finance from other donors.

 

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (173.84765619275 -5.6105189170041)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The project will benefit about 3,100 people directly and about 3,499 indirect beneficiaries. This is about 62% of the population of Tuvalu. The project can potentially reduce annual losses (including statistical value of life) worth up to up to $667,000 over 40-year time period (period of analysis for the economic analysis)
Funding Source: 

PIFs

Timetable of project implementation

Evaluation Report of the Baseline Projects

Environmental and Social Management Plan

Environmental and Social Impact Assessment

Project Location Map

Financing Amount: 
US$36 million (Green Climate Fund)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$2.9 million (Government of Tuvalu)
Project Details: 

 

Tuvalu is the fourth smallest nation in the world, comprising nine inhabited islands with a population of 10,640. With an average elevation of only 1.83 meters, it is one of the most vulnerable countries in the world to the impacts of climate change. The combination of two manifestations of climate change – continually intensifying cyclone events and sea level rise – threaten to have dire impacts on Tuvalu. In 2015 Cyclone Pam displaced 45% of the population. The purpose of this project is to reduce the impact of increasingly intensive wave activity, through the compounding effects of sea-level rise and intensifying storm events, that is amplifying coastal inundation and erosion. It is evident and well accepted that the effects of climate change will only worsen coastal inundation and erosion in Tuvalu. This project will increase the coverage of coastal protection from the baseline 570m to 2,780m benefiting nearly 29% of the entire population. Investments on coastal protection are directed at coastlines in three islands (Funafuti, Nanumea and Nanumaga) along areas that have a high concentration of houses, schools, hospitals and other social and economic assets (henceforth referred to as “high-value” coastline).

Despite the extreme level of vulnerability, Tuvalu currently does not have a single engineered coastal protection infrastructure project that is designed to withstand current and future impacts of sea-level rise and intensifying tropical storms. The only exceptions are two interventions that are currently being designed for a length of 570 m in Funafuti and Nukufetau. The combined factors of high upfront investments required for coastal protection, the public good and non-revenue nature of the required solutions, and the inability of the Government to service loans, have permitted the Government and the community to implement the recognized solutions only at a slow pace and in a highly fragmented manner in the past. Because available resources are generally far smaller than what is required for implementing appropriate response measures, the past initiatives have often resorted to community-scale interventions that hardly withstand the current wave energy, let alone integrating climate change risks into the design. Without support, this sub-optimal practice is likely to continue for the foreseeable future. This project is proposed so that Tuvalu can, finally, take comprehensive and systemic steps to manage coastal inundation risks.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Strengthening of institutions, human resources, awareness and knowledge for resilient coastal management.

  • Technical capacity, knowledge and awareness strengthened for monitoring, protection and maintenance of coastal protection infrastructure.

    The jurisdiction of coastal protection is shared across the Department of Lands and Survey (DoLS), Public Works Department (PWD) and Department of Environment (DoE). However, none of these departments currently have the technical capacity to monitor the dynamic processes of coastal change over time nor the capacity to design potential coastal interventions. Nor is there sufficient capacity within the Climate Change Policy Unit (CCPU) to coordinate the work of these departments for effective coastal protection. Due to this limitation, the Government is not able to carry out vulnerability assessments, site assessments and coastal design, make informed decisions about pragmatic solutions for coastal protection, and identify potential funding sources for implementation. Instead, they generally have to wait for a donor, often with particular areas of financing priority, to approach them. This lack of ability to carry out a preliminary technical assessment contributes to an increasing sense that the issue is out of their control and eventually to limited ownership. Further, although the CCPU was newly established in 2015 to coordinate government’s actions for climate change adaptation and mitigation, medium- to long-term capacity building efforts are needed in the technical areas of climate change, coordination, project design and management, financial management, knowledge management and reporting.

  • Long-term national human resource capacity and awareness enhanced for sustainable coastal protection

    In the specific context of Tuvalu, the capacity building support conventionally delivered in donor-supported projects has been insufficient to establish a foundation for sustainability. This is because typically the capacity building support in these projects is exclusively targeting the existing government staff, which is small in number, and the progress is immediately undone if the staff members leave the government system. This approach to capacity building represents numerous missed opportunities for transforming the country. Climate change adaptation is defined by UNFCCC as a series of “adjustments in ecological, social, or economic systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli and their effects or impacts” and by nature, it is an iterative, long-term process. Adaptation efforts in SIDS like Tuvalu must embrace, in their core principle, a strategy to build capacity of the entire country that goes well beyond that of the government system.

Output 2: Vulnerability of key coastal infrastructure including homes, schools, hospitals and other assets is reduced against wave induced damage.

  • Coastal protection design, site-specific assessments and ESIA undertaken in all islands in a participatory manner

    A detailed, participatory design and site-specific assessment will be carried out in all the islands in Tuvalu. This process is needed not only to make final adjustments in the design of the coastal protection measures (such as the angle of the structure and protection of the toe of the structure) to maximize the effectiveness and longevity of the structure for the three targeted islands, but also to equip the other, non-targeted islands, with the necessary information for attracting donor resources in the future, including from GCF. The multi-stakeholder, gender-responsive planning and design process will take place to ensure that beneficiaries are fully informed and are able to contribute to the detail design and functionality of the coastal protection measures in each of the islands. The process will, for example, look into how the target community (men, women, youth, and elderly) interacts with the ocean and coastline, which is an important design element of coastal protection infrastructure. The assessment will result in a set of adaptation options, detailed technical drawings, bill of quantity, tender documents and detailed costing of the interventions. As described earlier, this process will be used as an opportunity to provide hands-on trainings for government staff from the DLS, PWD and DoE.

    Resources will be used to put in place a robust coastal protection infrastructure along 2,210m of vulnerable coastlines of Funafuti, Nanumea and Nanumaga to defend high value assets of the targeted islands. This translates to targeting nearly 28% of the high value zone of the country, which currently has no protective measures. Also this represents 10% of all vulnerable coastlines in the country. The design criteria are set such that the design will reflect the projected sea level rise and notional 200-year return period storm surge events. Geo-textile container revetments in Nanumea and Nanumaga will have minimum design life of 25 years; but, with the appropriate selection of vandal resistant bags for the top layer walls and, training of PWD and community members for monitoring and simple repair, the life expectancy is expected to be longer.

Output 3: A sustainable financing mechanism established for long-term adaptation efforts.

  • All Island Strategic Plans and annual budgets integrate island-specific climate risks through gender sensitive, participatory processes

    Successful climate risk mainstreaming into ISPs and effective use of available domestic financing will facilitate island-led actions, enhance planned and autonomous adaptation, and ultimately, increase resilience at the island level. In the context of coastal interventions envisaged in the GCF project, a strengthened ISP process will improve longer-term impact and replication potential of the GCF investments as domestic resources, allocated through ISPs, are expected to be used to maintain the GCF investments and to expand the coastal protection coverage. For the expansion of coastal protection measures beyond donor-assisted projects, lower-cost ecosystem-based approaches are a more realistic option given the limited available finance domestically. This activity will strengthen the critical foundation to facilitate this process.

  • Capacity of Kaupules, Falekaupules and community members strengthened for monitoring coastal adaptation investments

    This project will also be used to strengthen the capacity of both outer island administrations and community members for monitoring, reporting and verifying the progress of adaptation investments as an integral element of ISP support. Due to the special geographical condition of Tuvalu where islands are several days away from the central government, upward accountability to the central government and downward accountability to citizens can easily be diluted among kaupules. Thus, nurturing the sense of oversight among community members becomes critical for ensuring transparent, sustainable, demand-driven service delivery. Support to ISP formulation, budgeting and execution, the focus of Activity 3.1, and support for community members for an independent oversight of the ISP process, the focus of Activity 3.2, must go hand-in-hand. At the same time, outer island administrations also need to develop their capacity to report the use of resources and progress of investments to their constituents.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 


Contacts: 
UNDP
Yasuke Taishi
Mr
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


News and Updates: 

Funding Proposal approved by Green Climate Fund Board: 30 June 2016
Local Project Appraisal Committee meeting (LPAC): 15 February 2017
Funded Activity Agreement (FAA) effectiveness reached: 7 June 2017
Project Document signature between UNDP and Government: 14 June 2017
First disbursement received: 11 July 2017
Launch and inception workshop with key stakeholders: 30 August 2017

'Youths are the future of climate resilience', Fiji Times, February 11, 2018. As well as addressing the impacts and causes of climate change, we need to look to the solutions. How are communities going to, not just adapt, but build their resilience? What does resilience even mean? And how do we do it?  One of the keys to building it, and addressing the impacts of climate change, is ensuring countries themselves are leading in both developing and implementing the solutions. 

'Tuvalu scholarships awarded (under Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project)', Radio New Zealand, February 8, 2018. Two students from Tuvalu have been granted university scholarships under the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project. Investing in young people is among the country's environmental adaptation plans. Moeo Finauga said the students would be offered jobs on the project once they had completed their studies.

'Shoring up Tuvalu's Climate Resilience', UNDP Asia Pacific blog, August 30 2017. As the Tuvalu Coastal Adapation Project launches, celebration in Funafuti. Regional Technical Advisor, Yusuke Taishi, shares his thoughts on the occasion.

'Tuvalu’s climate resilience shored up with launch of US$38.9 million adaptation project', UNDP Pacific, August 30, 2017. The Prime Minister of Tuvalu along with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) officially launch the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project (TCAP) marking the start of an ambitious, large-scale push to protect the Pacific island nation from climate change.

'Tuvalu signs financing agreement to access Climate Fund' - Tuvalu Government, July 5 2017. Tuvalu has become the first Pacific Island country to sign the Financing Framework Agreement to access funds for coastal protection activities from the Green Climate Fund. The elated Prime Minister said the financing agreement, worth almost US$39 million will fund the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project on the three islands of Nanumea, Nanumaga and Funafuti. The process will begin in August with a workshop where Tuvalu Government and UNDP will coordinate logistics.  

'Government of Tuvalu launches new coastal protection project to bolster resilience to climate change' - UNDP, July 6, 2017. A signing ceremony took place in Suva on 14 June between the Tuvalu Prime Minister Enele Sopoaga and UNDP Resident Representative Osnat Lubrani. “The protection of our country’s vulnerable coastlines is an urgent priority of the Government of Tuvalu,” said the Prime Minister of Tuvalu, Hon. Enele Sosene Sopoaga.

'Green Climate Fund finance allocation builds Tuvalu’s resilience' - Green Climate Fund, July 3, 2017. The Green Climate Fund is transferring funds to help strengthen the island nation of Tuvalu against the double climate threats of rising sea levels and destructive cyclones. GCF is sending the first USD 2 million tranche of its USD 36 million contribution.

Information in French / Informations en français: 


Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
The purpose of this project is to reduce the impact of increasingly intensive wave activity, through the compounding effects of sea-level rise and intensifying storm events, that is amplifying coastal inundation and erosion. It is evident and well accepted that the effects of climate change will only worsen coastal inundation and erosion in Tuvalu. This projectt will increase the coverage of coastal protection from the baseline 570m to 2,780m benefiting nearly 29% of the entire population. Investments on coastal protection are directed at coastlines in three islands (Funafuti, Nanumea and Nanumaga) along areas that have a high concentration of houses, schools, hospitals and other social and economic assets (henceforth referred to as “high-value” coastline).
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: Strengthening of institutions, human resources, awareness and knowledge for resilient coastal management.

Output 2: Vulnerability of key coastal infrastructure including homes, schools, hospitals and other assets is reduced against wave induced damage.

Output 3: A sustainable financing mechanism established for long-term adaptation efforts.

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2024
Civil Society Engagement: 


Economics of Climate Change Adaptation Programme in Asia and the Pacific

The Economics of Climate Change Adaptation Programme in Asia and the Pacific

The objective of this programme, the first phase of which ran between 2012 and 2015, was to strengthen the capacity of technical officers in Ministries of Planning/Finance, as well as line Ministries (Environment, Agriculture, Water, Public Works, and others) to assess economic costs and benefits when evaluating different adaptation alternatives, as they relate to medium- and long-term national, sub-national and sectoral development plans.

The programme  aimed to produce a cadre of practitioners in government who can prepare high-quality economic analyses related to climate change adaptation projects and programmes. In coordination with other ongoing and planned UNDP initiatives, the programme was designed to strengthen governments’ capacity to more fully integrate climate change adaptation into national, sub-national and sector planning and budgeting.

Ultimately, the programme sought to institutionalize these important analytical skills into ministries and departments, and to enable countries to formulate economically efficient and climate resilient development plans, including National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) - a process established under the Cancun Adaptation Framework (CAF) to help countries identify their medium- and long-term adaptation needs.

In 2017, the ECCA programme transitioned into Phase Two, in collaboration with the Asian Insititute of Technology.

For more information visit : ECCA Asia and the Pacific.

Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The programme aims to produce a cadre of technical officers in each country who are able to conduct economic analyses of climate change adaptation and to feed those analyses into planning and budgeting processes. The programme will seek to strengthen existing systems of sector level planning and budgeting to incorporate key results from the economics of adaptation so that decisions can be evidence-based.
Funding Source: 

Knowledge Products

Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA): Sri Lanka

Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA): Mongolia

Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA): Viet Nam

Training & Tools

Economics of Adaptation: Toolkit

Highlights

Assessments and Background Documents

Background paper - Pacific Cost-Benefit Analysis Initiative (P-CBA)

Document

Hydro-Economic Model Webinar

Examples of Cost- Benefit Analysis Reports

Niue PACC Cost- Benefit Analysis Final Report

Tuvalu PACC Cost- Benefit Analysis Final Report

The Solomon Islands PACC Cost- Benefit Analysis Final Report

The Republic of Marshall Islands PACC Cost- Benefit Analysis Report

Palau PACC Cost- Benefit Analysis Report

Samoa PACC Cost- Benefit Analysis Final Report

Relevant Peer-Reviewed Articles

Climate Models at Their Limit? (Mark Maslin and Patrick Austin, 2012)

Efficient Adaptation to Climate Change (Robert Mendelsohn, 2000)

Reports and Publications of relevance to Country Teams

Potential Impacts of Climate Change on the Egyptian Economy (2012)

Frequently Asked Questions: The UNDP Capacity Assessment Methodology (UNDP, 2009)

Capacity Development: Measuring Capacity (UNDP, 2010)

Capacity Development: Practice Note (UNDP, 2008)

Capacity Assessment: Practice Note (UNDP, 2008)

Capacity Development: A UNDP Primer (UNDP, 2009)

Guide to Cost-Benefit Analysis of Investment Projects (European Commission, 2008)

Handbook on Economic Analysis of Investment Operations (World Bank, 1998)

Annotated Bibliography of Adaptation Studies

Project Details: 

The programme was designed and rolled out as a compliment to UNDP's support to countries on adaptation with financing from the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund (managed by the Global Environment Facility) and the Adaptation Fund. It was aligned with UNDP-GEF-UNEP support to countries that are preparing to formulate National Adaptation Plans (NAPs).

Specifically, the approach adopted in this capacity building programme was based on the following key elements:

• Training of technical officers at the national and sub-national level to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options. 
• Support to technical officers at the national and sub-national level, to assess the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options in order to promote learning by doing.
• Establishment of the training programme within a suitable center of excellence in the country or region that can provide continuous technical advisory support on the economics of adaptation to countries developing national adaptation plans and investment projects.
• Convening of policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries at the country and regional level to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development plans and investment projects.
• Development and nurturing of a virtual community of practice of technical officers working on the economics of adaptation.
• Support for the appraisal of investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of climate finance.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 


• Technical officers in Planning, Finance, Environment, Agriculture, Water and Public Works Ministries and others at the national and sub-national level were trained to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts, as well as adaptation options. 
• Country Teams (comprised of technical officers from relevant Government Ministries, academia and others) conducted assessments on the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options (this work was linked to ongoing adaptation projects financed by the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund and/or Adaptation Fund).
• Investment projects for adaptation financed from current and emerging sources of funds such as the Green Climate Fund were assessed in terms of their economic costs and benefits.
• The training programme was established within a suitable learning center in the country or region in order to provide continuous technical advisory support to countries on the assessment of economic costs/benefits of adaptation.
• Regular policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries were conducted at the country and regional level, to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development planning process.
• A virtual community of practice working on the economics of adaptation was established, with innovative means to share lessons and knowledge, including Live Chats and Webinars- virtual classroom settings where participants discuss issues with the lead mentors as well as each other. The Global ALM platform provided facilities for the community of practice to share learning materials, as well as lessons learned.

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
    Head of Climate Change Adaptation, Global Environmental Finance Unit, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support
    UNDP
    Mari Tomova
    Technical Specialist
    Project Status: 
    News and Updates: 

    'Uniting theory and action: Asia Pacific Economics of Climate Change Adaptation programme relaunches' - UNDP, June 2017. Notice of launch of Phase Two of the ECCA  Programme in partnership with the Asian Institute of Technology.

    Economics of Climate Change Adaptation Training, 21 August – 1 September 2017, Pathum Thani, Thailand. Materials from training, lead by Asian Institute of Technology in collaboration with UNDP.


     

    Information in French / Informations en français: 


    Display Photo: 
    Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 


    Civil Society Engagement: 


    Vanuatu Coastal Adaptation Project (VCAP)

    Like most small island nations, the coastal zone in Vanuatu is the country’s hub of economic activity. Best estimates of long term, systematic changes indicate that by 2050, sea level is likely to have increased by 20 cm. Thus in order to protect its economy it is imperative to enhance the adaptive capacity of the coastal zone in Vanuatu.

    This UNDP-supported, GEF-LDCF funded project, "Vanuatu Coastal Adaptation Project (VCAP)", is working to build resilience through improved infrastructure, sustained livelihoods, and increased food production. These efforts are working to improve the quality of life in targeted vulnerable areas in the coastal zone of the island nation. 

    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (167.497558559 -16.1671969236)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    The coastal communities of Vanuatu
    Funding Source: 

    Vanuatu Coastal Adaptation Project Video

    The Vanuatu Coastal Adaptation Project (V-CAP) Video gives an overview of the effects of climate change in Vanuatu and details the work that the project is undertaking to address these challenges. 

    Newsletter

    VCAP (VANUATU COASTAL ADAPTATION PROJECT) - Newsletter, December 2015

    VCAP (VANUATU COASTAL ADAPTATION PROJECT) - Newsletter, July 2015

    PIFs

    Vanuatu – LDCF Project Identification Form (12 October 2012)

    Financing Amount: 
    $8,833,000 (As of 12 October 2012, detailed in PIF)
    Co-Financing Total: 
    $34,431,217 (As of 12 October 2012, detailed in PIF)
    Project Details: 

    (More information to come)

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    The project has four main components with the following associated outcomes –

    1. Integrated community approaches to climate change adaptation through the formulation and mainstreaming of adaptation plans including risk management, preparedness and response plans (Output 1.1); rehabilitation of threatened coastal ecosystems and resources such as mangroves, coral reefs, and fisheries to support livelihoods and food production (Output 1.2); stabilization of coastal areas through re-vegetation and other ‘soft’ approaches (Output 1.3) and; improved resilience through climate proofing of selected public conveyance infrastructure in the coastal zone (Output 1.4).
    2. Information and early warning systems on coastal hazards including Automated Weather System  (AWS) for real time monitoring of climate-related hazards (Output 2.1); timely release of early warnings against coastal flooding and storm surges through public media (Output 2.2); capacity building Vanuatu Meteorological and Geo-hazards Department (VMGD) staff in the operation and maintenance of AWS (Output 2.3)
    3. Climate change governance including review of legislation and national/sector policies with impacts on climate change adaptation (Output 3.1); capacity building of key national and provincial government agencies in areas of monitoring, evaluation and mainstreaming of climate-related policies and regulations (Output 3.2) and; empowerment of communities through participatory approaches in vulnerability assessments, planning and community-based adaptation measures and capacity building (Output 3.3).
    4. Knowledge management including the documentation and dissemination of best practices to all local and national stakeholders (Output 4.1) and; development of awareness, training and education programmes in Bislama and French (Output 4.2).
    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    (More information to come)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Jose Padilla
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Location: 
    Project Status: 
    Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

    (More information to come)

    Integrating Rio Convention Provisions into Ukraine’s National Environmental Policy Framework

    Some of the challenges plaguing the implementation of Rio conventions in Ukraine are –
    • Global environmental action plans are not mainstreamed into national and regional policy planning.
    • Non inclusion of environmental conventions and integrated resource management at regional and local levels.
    • Integration of the Rio Conventions into the national natural resource management legal frameworks is lacking .

    In order to address the above, as well as a national sustainable development strategy, this UNDP-supported, GEF Trust project, Integrating Rio Convention Provisions into Ukraine’s National Environmental Policy Framework, aims to develops organizational and systematic capacity to develop implement and operationalize policy.
     

    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (30.5859374916 50.3594803494)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources, Government of Ukraine
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $990,000 (As of 20 June 2012, detailed in PIF)

    PIFs

    Ukraine – GEF Trust Project Identification Form (20 June 2012)

    Co-Financing Total: 
    $2,100,000 (As of 20 June 2012, detailed in PIF)
    Project Details: 

    (More information to come)

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    The project has three main components with the following associated outcomes –

    1. Policy and institutional framework – this component includes updated institutional assessment covering responsibilities related to implementing Rio Conventions (Outcput 1.1) and the development of a Sustainable Development Strategy for Ukraine (SDSU) (Output 1.2).
    2. National Capacity to mainstream the Rio Conventions and to implement the SDSU including  a proposal for creating the Sustainable Development Agency in Ukraine (Output 2.1); development of a manual on integrating Rio Convention provisions into policy and economic sectoral planning processes (Output 2.2) and; identifying a cadre of trained personel at national and local level (Output 2.3).
    3. Public awareness at local level including public awareness on the impact of global environmental threats on local welfare (Output 3.1) and; public advocacy linking Rio conventions to local level planning and budget allocation processes (Output 3.2).

     

    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    (More information to come)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Tom Twining Ward
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Location: 
    Project Status: 
    Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

    (More information to come)

    Strengthening National and Decentralized Management for Global Environmental Benefits in Togo

    The project titled “Strengthening National and Decentralized Management for Global Environmental Benefits in Togo” aims to strengthen capacities at the systemic, organizational, and individual levels of the government. These in turn will reinforce Togo's efforts to mainstream environmental priorities into sectoral policies and apply sound environmental management practices.  The expected outcome of the project is that Togo will be able to catalyze effective and efficient implementation of international environmental conventions.

    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (1.14257811795 7.54765560789)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Ministry for the Environment and Forest Resources (MERF), Government of Togo
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $847,000 (As of 31 January 2012, detailed in PIF)

    PIFs

    Togo – GEF Trust Project Identification Form (31 January 2012)

    Co-Financing Total: 
    $1,165,000 (As of 31 January 2012, detailed in PIF)
    Project Details: 

    (More information to come)

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    The project has two main components with the following associated outcomes –

    1. Strengthen the national institutional framework for environmental management through creation of tools for the National Commission for Sustainable Development (CNDD) to effectively coordinate the implementation of global environment convention articles (Outcome 1.1); collection of data, knowledge, tools and human resources for the National Agency for Environmental Management (ANGE) to effectively implement the global environment Convention articles lying within its mandate (Outcome 1.2); capacity building of the National Environmental Fund (FNE) to mobilize and allocate resources (Outcome 1.3) and; capacity building of the National Committees for the global conventions to effectively oversee the achievement of the Convention’s obligations, and to ensure coordination and synergies (Outcome 1.4).
    2. Decentralization of planning and management to implement the global environment conventions including formulation of a modified decentralization methodology, revised databases, guidelines, monitoring system and local plans among others. This will first be piloted and then replicated across the country to support adaptation and conservation activities.
    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    (More information to come)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Tom Twining Ward
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Location: 
    Project Status: 
    Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

    (More information to come)

    Mainstreaming Global Environment Commitments for Effective National Environmental Management in Suriname

    Presently there is poor communication amongst ministries and the system for accounting towards meeting the commitments under the conventions is weak. Coupled with low levels of awareness, knowledge and skills among decision-makers, Suriname is struggling to effectively fulfill its obligations towards the 3 Rio Conventions. With the aim of creating a steady platform for effective and efficient political dialogue and cross-institutional alliances, this UNDP-supported, GEF Trust funded project, Mainstreaming Global Environment Commitments for Effective National Environmental Management in Suriname, will work to strengthen the national environmental management at all levels.

    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (-55.7226562693 4.41213681023)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Ministry of Labour, Technological Development and Environment, Government of Suriname
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $1,078,000 (As of 29 August 2012, detailed in PIF)

    PIFs

    Co-Financing Total: 
    $900,000 (As of 29 August 2012, detailed in PIF)
    Project Details: 

    (More information to come)

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    The project has two main components with the following associated outcomes –

    1. Generation of access and use of information through  improved decision-support mechanisms and the development of an environmental information and knowlege platform by targetting the ability of institutions and stakeholders to manage information for better environmental planning and processes (Outcome 1.1) and ; increasing the ability of stakeholders to diagnose, understand and transform information into local actions (Outcome 1.2)
    2. Creating and enhancing capacities for management and implementation on convention guidelines including the strengthening of the existing structures and coordination mechanisms to institutionalize coordination across agencies and other relevant  actors  (Outcome 2.1); negotiations of financial commitments to finance the delivery of global environmental outcomes (Outcome 2.2) and; improve the effectiveness of institutions and enhance the functioning of the political, economic, and social system (Outcome 2.3).
    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    (More information to come)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Tom Twining Ward
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Location: 
    Project Status: 
    Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

    (More information to come)

    Mainstreaming global environmental concerns in the post-conflict rapid development of Sri Lanka

    Having recently successfully achieved an end to armed conflict in the country, Sri Lanka is in the process of adopting a peaceful and rapid planned development process. Considering the rich biodiversity of the country, the Sri Lankan government recognizes that it is equally necessary to protect natural resources, to safeguard the environment, and to be prudent in the use of the natural assets. However it has been identified that to do so would require additional capacity at systemic, institutional and individual levels for managing and disseminating information.

    In an effort to respond to this challenge, this UNDP-supported, GEF Trust fund project, Mainstreaming global environmental concerns in the post-conflict rapid development of Sri Lanka, is to be implemented through two components – the strengthening of environmental data and information systems including global reporting and mainstreaming environment into awareness, planning, decision-making and socio-economic development.
     

    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (80.5078124754 6.28253854793)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Ministry of Environment, Government of Sri Lanka
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $880,000 (As of 7 November 2012 detailed in PIF)

    PIFs

    Co-Financing Total: 
    $1,675,000 (As of 7 November 2012 detailed in PIF)
    Project Details: 

    (More information to come)

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    The project has two components with the following associated outcomes –

    Data and information management through the development of a data collection system that covers needs of Rio Convention and Rio+20 outcomes (Outcome 1.1); An accessible and user-friendly national data clearing house, with links to sub-national and sector agencies (Outcome 1.2); Identification of stakeholders with the  capacity to access, use and intepret the information (Outcome 1.3) and;Identification of a set of indicators for environment monitoring and natural resources management supporting both global and national needs (Output 1.4).

    Planning and decision-making through ncreased capacity in planning departments to integrate global environment and local environment into integrated planning and monitoring (Outcome 2.1); High level awareness of global environmental values and environmental sustainability and resilience issues (Outcome 2.2) and; Operationalization of the National (Haritha Lanka) Green Strategy and Action Plan that also address global environmental concerns (Outcome 2.3).

    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    (More information to come)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Tom Twining Ward
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Location: 
    Project Status: 
    Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

    (More information to come)