Disaster Risk Reduction

Taxonomy Term List

Strengthening climate information and early warning systems for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change in Guinea

Through the project, "Strengthening climate information and early warning systems for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change in Guinea", UNDP seeks to support  strengthened national capacities, including the participation of communities to prevent, reduce, mitigate and cope with the impact of the systemic shocks form natural hazards. The project also aims to  to strengthen the capacity of developing countries to mainstream climate change adaptation policies into national development plans.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$5 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$39 million (proposed co-financing)
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes:
• 1. Enhanced capacity of national hydro-meteorological (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change
• 2. Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and mainstreaming CC in the long-term development plans

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1. Enhanced capacity of national hydro-meteorological (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change

Outcome 2. Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and mainstreaming CC in the long-term development plans

Addressing the Risks of Climate Induced Disasters in Bhutan through Enhanced National and Local Capacity for Effective Actions

The current NAPA II project, Addressing the Risk of Climate-Induced Disasters through Enhanced National and Local Capacity in Bhutan,  will address urgent and immediate climate change adaptation needs and leverage co-financing resources from national government, bilateral and other multilateral sources, and the private sector.  The project is working to “enhance national, local and community capacity to prepare for and respond to climate induced multi-hazards to reduce potential losses of human lives, national economic infrastructure, livelihood and livelihood assets.”

The USD 11.49 million project is funded by Global Environment Facility/Least Developed Countries Fund, and coordinated by the National Environment Commission Secretariat in partnership with UNDP, Bhutan. The project will safeguard essential economic and livelihood infrastructure in hazard-prone communities and key industrial areas from increasing climate hazards such as floods, landslides, windstorms and forest fire through reducing vulnerability at high-risk areas and increasing adaptive capacity of community-level disaster risk management institutions.

Source: UNDP Bhutan Project Identification Form (May 1, 2012), and the Bhutan NAPA II brochure, June 2015.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (89.3851300344 26.8640612086)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural communities in Bhutan
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
USD 11.49 million (as detailed in the Project Brochure, June 2015)

Brochures, Posters, Communications Products

Assessments and Background Documents

Bhutan Second National Communication (2011)

Plans and policies of relevance to NAPs for Least Developed Countries (LDCs)

PIFs

UNDP Bhutan Project Identification Form (May 2012)

Project Details: 

The overarching objective of the project is to increase national, local and community capacity to prepare for and respond to climate-induced multi-hazards to reduce potential losses of human lives, national economic infrastructure, livelihoods and livelihood assets. This objective is fully aligned with the development priorities of the RGoB as set out in Bhutan’s tenth 5-year plan, which is in turn underpinned and guided by the long-term development vision of Gross National Happiness (GNH) and Bhutan 2020: A Vision for Peace, Prosperity and Happiness. Under the four pillars of GNH (i.e. sustainable and equitable socio-economic development; environmental conservation; preservation and promotion of culture; and good governance), the 5-year plan places a strong emphasis, among others, on balanced rural-urban development for poverty alleviation, expansion/maintenance of key economic infrastructure including road infrastructure that connects rural and urban centers, and strengthening of the agricultural sector which continues to employ the majority of Bhutanese and be the backbone of the rural economy.

This project will implement priority interventions addressed in Bhutan's National Adaptation Programme of Actions corresponding to the following objectives, in part or full, as outlined in NAPA profile:

  • Disaster management strategy
  • Weather forecasting system to serve farmers and agriculture
  • Landslide management and flood prevention
  • Flood protection of downstream industrial and agricultural area
  • Rainwater harvesting
  • Promote community-based forest fire management and prevention

Situated on the southern slope of the Eastern Himalayas, Bhutan’s landscape is mountainous and rugged with elevations ranging from 100m in the southern foothills to 7500m towards north. Due to its topography, habitable and arable areas are limited to approximately 8.3% and 2.9%, respectively, of the landmass. Agriculture, which employs 69% of the population and accounts for 78% of monetary income in rural households, and industrial activities are largely practiced in this highly confined space that its topography permits. While Bhutan is in general endowed with abundant water resources from the four major rivers and their tributaries, most of the large rivers are at the bottom of valleys and gorges rendering these rich water resources largely inaccessible for agriculture or domestic use. As a result, irrigation is limited to areas near small perennial streams that exist above main rivers and majority of farmers rely primarily on monsoonal rains, which account for 60-90% of annual precipitation.

Bhutan is one of the most disaster prone countries in the Asia-Pacific region, irrespective of the presence of climate change. The country is exposed to multiple hazards, most prominently flash floods, landslides, windstorms, earthquakes, forest fires, and glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). In terms of relative exposure to flood risks (as % of population), Bhutan ranks fourth highest in the region. Although the direct human risks of landslides, windstorms, and forest fires are not particularly higher compared to other countries, the socioeconomic repercussions from these events are thought to be high due to the baseline poverty prevalence.

Climate change is likely to magnify the intensity and frequency of these hazards. In fact, according to the International Disaster Database, among the top 10 natural disasters in Bhutan between 1900 to 2012, in terms of the number of casualties and number affected, all of them occurred in the last two decades (except epidemic outbreaks), which makes certain degree of attribution of climate change to the increasing magnitude of such hazards plausible. The most pronounced consequences of climate change in Bhutan are two folds: disruptions in the monsoonal system and increasing/intensifying trends of extreme hydro-meteorological hazards, both of which are obviously closely linked. These disturbances will amplify the socioeconomic challenges for the Bhutanese society, especially in rural areas where the majority of the population is engaged in rain-fed agriculture and rampant poverty makes them least equipped to adapt to creeping changes in climate.

Monsoon rains generally arrive during the summer months (from late June to late September). Downscaled simulations undertaken in Bhutan’s SNC indicate that the mean annual rainfall will increase by 26-30% by 2069 compared to the baseline year of 1980. This increase occurs primarily during the summer monsoon season while the dry winter season rainfall is projected to decline slightly. In addition, accelerated melting of glaciers, which act as a gigantic natural water retention and dispensing mechanism to communities downstream, is disrupting the hydrological regime of the perennial river systems in the region. All in all, climate change will increase the uncertainty of water availability throughout the year, and rural farmers are likely to have to better manage high fluctuation of rainfalls – increasing volume of monsoonal rain so that they can sustain longer dry periods. This poses significant risks to development when built rural infrastructure to alleviate water shortages, such as communal rainwater harvesting, is minimally available. 

Source: UNDP Bhutan Project Identification Form (May 1, 2012)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Risks from climate-induced floods and landslides reduced in the economic and industrial hub of Bhutan
    • Output 1.1: Protection of Pasakha Industrial area from flooding events through riverbank protection, river training and development of flood buffer zones
    • Output 1.2: Slope stabilization to reduce climate-induced landslides in the Phuntsholing Township
    • Output 1.3: Integrated risk hazard assessment and mapping completed in 4 critical landslide and flashflood prone areas with data collection standards compatible with the national database
  • Outcome 2: Community resilience to climate-induced risks (drought, flood, landslides, windstorms, forest fires) strengthened in at least four Dzongkhags
    • Output 2.1: Climate-resilient water harvesting, storage and distribution systems designed, built and rehabilitated in at least four Dzongkhags, based on observed and projected changes in rainfall patterns and intensity
    • Output 2.2: Community-level water resource inventory completed and maintained by Dzongkhag administration to increase the adaptive capacity of communities in the face of increasing water scarcity
    • Output 2.3: Disaster Management Institutions at various levels established and trained in four Dzongkhags to prepare for, and respond to, more frequent and intense floods, storms and wildfire events
  • Outcome 3: Relevant information about climate-related risks and threats shared across community-based organizations and planners in climate-sensitive policy sectors on a timely and reliable basis
    • Output 3.1: Enhanced quality, availability and transfer of real-time climate data in all Dzongkhags which experience increasing frequency of extreme hydo-meterological events
    • Output 3.2: Increased effectiveness of National Weather and Flood Forecasting and Warning Center through improved capacity to analyze, manage and disseminate climate information in a timely manner

Source: UNDP Bhutan Project Identification Form (May 1, 2012)

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

  • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Ugyen Dorji
Project Support Officer
UNDP
Yusuke Taishi
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 

Strengthening Community Resilience to Climate Induced Natural Disasters in Rural Timor-Leste

The government of Timor-Leste is currently investing heavily in transport infrastructure as a basis for securing the country’s long-term development goals. These investments are at risk as a result of climate change and therefore require a strategy to ensure their long-term sustenance. The Dili to Ainaro development corridor is one such region that is increasingly at risk from climate change and disaster related impacts including localized flooding, landslides and strong winds. Therefore, this project will focus on the populace dependent on critical economic infrastructure to make it more resilient through prevention and preparedness measures. Consequently, this will help to secure the medium to long-term development benefits of vulnerable local people of this region.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (126.496582012 -8.59731586984)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Population dependent on critical infrastructure in the Dili to Ainaro development corridor
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$5,748,750 (As of February 2013, detailed in PIF)

PIFs

Timor Leste – LDCF Project Identification Form (February 2013)

Co-Financing Total: 
$78,726,780 (As of February 2013, detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has three main components with the following associated outcomes –

  1. Improved climate and disaster risk management is enabled through the establishment of a national training and knowledge hub focusing on climate risk and vulnerability assessment, damage and loss assessment, contingency planning among others (Outcome 1.1) and; the extension of national DRM policy and institutional roles to address climate change and disaster risk reduction measures, including assessment methods etc. (Outcome 1.2).
  2. Climate and disaster risk planning along with its budgeting and delivery is strengthened including the strengthening of district and sub-district Disaster Management Committees and District Disaster Operation Centres to plan, budget and deliver climate induced disaster prevention financing (Outcome 2.1) and; design of community to district level EWS systems for climate induced extreme events (Outcome 2.2).
  3. Investments are made in climate resilient community-based adaptation measures including community level climate change vulnerability and risk assessments with a specific focus on gender (Outcome 3.1) and; design and implementation of community level watershed management measures to reduce direct physical impacts of high intensity rainfall events in climate vulnerable hotspots along the Dili to Ainaro development corridor (Outcome 3.2).

 

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Climate Risk Finance for Rain-fed Farming in Sudan

A country housing the largest number of displaced population, Sudan faces additional stress as a result of climate change. In particular, the increasingly unreliable nature of rainfall, together with its concentration into short growing seasons, heightens the vulnerability of Sudan’s rain-fed agricultural systems.

This UNDP-supported, LDCF funded project, Climate Risk Finance for Sustainable and Climate Resilient Rain-fed Farming and Pastoral Systems in Sudan, therefore aims to create an enabling environment for climate risk management of smallholder farmers and pastoralists in rain-fed areas. This will include the establishment of an effective climate observation infrastructure to enable climate change resilient decision-making in local communities. At the same time, the project will also create a regulatory framework to develop and deliver micro credit and climate risk insurance services.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (31.8164062415 14.6473683903)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The agricultural and pastoral community of Kassala, N Kordofan and Gedarif in Sudan
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$6,270,000 (As of 10 April 2012, detailed in PIF)

PIFs

Sudan – LDCF Project Identification Form (10 April 2012)

Co-Financing Total: 
$12,200,000 (As of 10 April 2012, detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has three main components with associated outcomes –

  1. Creation of the institutional framework and capacity for sustainable climate observation and early warning including rainfall modelling and simulations for  three target states Kassala, N Kordofan,  Gedarif (Outcome 1.1); installation of 3 solar powered automated weather stations for purposes of drought forecasting and early warning (Outcome 1.2); training the staff of Sudan Meteorological Authority and Remote Sensing Authority on climate observation, risk analysis, forecasting and early warning (Outcome 1.3) and; improved communication protocols and mechanisms to provide timely and accurate weather and climate risk forecasts to farmers and  pastoralists (Outcome 1.4).
  2. Design and deployment of weather index-based insurance to address residual risk and promote long term adaptation including a comparative analysis and feasibility assessment of different business models for index-based insurance (Outcome 2.1); design and establishment of a risk transfer product for smallholder farmers and pastoralists who depend on rain-fed farming systems (Outcome 2.2); delivery of insurance literacy programme/awareness campaign to small businesses, community-based organisations, local farmers and pastoral communities (Outcome 2.3) and; assessment and rescommendations for the legal and regulatory framework for risk transfer in target states (Outcome 2.4)
  3. Provision of financial services for  farmers and pastoralists to increase adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods including the analysis of legal and regulatory framework to increase the  co-provision of microcredit and microinsurance  services (Outcome 3.1); development of community adaptation plans enabling the provision of MFI credit packages (Outcome 3.2); design of at least 3 micro-credit products to increase resilience of  farming and pastoral practices as prioritised in local adaptation plans (Outcome 3.3) and; desing of a flexible seasonal and annual repayment programme for pastoral mobility and income cycles of local farmers (Outcome 3.4).
     

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Implementing adaptation priorities through national development plans in Malawi

Extreme weather events have adversely impacted Malawi’s food security, water security, energy supply, infrastructure, human health and the sustainable livelihoods of family households. Further, the unsustainable use of natural resource costs Malawi USD191 million or 5.3% of GDP every year with the resulting forest cover in the country decreasing from 41% in 1990 to 35% in 2008.

This GEF-LDCF funded project, Implementing urgent adaptation priorities through strengthened decentralized and national development plans in Malawi, therefore looks at mainstreaming disaster risk reduction into sustainable development policies and planning processes at all levels of government, while establishing an effective system to identify, assess and monitor disaster risks including early warning systems in the country.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (34.8046874844 -14.1259217663)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$4,950,000

PIFs

Malawi – LDCF Project Identification Form

Co-Financing Total: 
$15,500,000
Project Details: 

 

(More Information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

 

The project has 3 primary components with associated outcomes –

  1. Integrated adaptation planning at District and Provincial levels including institutional analysis to determine CCA expenditures and CCA expenditure gaps within District level budgets (Outcome 1.1); Professional training on climate change integration in local development planning, policies (Outcome 1.2); Participatory assessments on vulnerability and adaptation to prioritize community CCA measures (Outcome 1.3); Community meetings to develop district-level disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation plans for 4 vulnerable districts (Outcome 1.4); Integration of CCA priorities into the District Development Plans and budgets, and Local Council annual investment plans (Outcome 1.5); Integration of CCA resilience principles, priorities and role definition into development of district policies and regulations (Output 1.6); Integration of CCA resilience principles into results based management training undertaken in UNDP-supported governance programmes (Output 1.7); Addition of CCA vulnerability/CCA resilience indicators to district level databanks (developed in UNDP-supported governance programmes) for planning purposes (Output 1.8) and; Development of an incentive plan to support the effective deployment of roles and responsibilities (Output 1.9)
  2. Implementing urgent adaptation measures through decentralized planning processes including baseline rural development investments adjusted to become resilient to climate change (Output 2.1); Implementation of adaptation measures defined by communities during the development of the District-level adaptation plans to promote drought and flood management and climate resilience (Output 2.2); Provision of technical training and other support as defined by communities to implement the CCA plans sustainably (Output 2.3) and; Provision and use of weather forecast information on short timescales to manage risks to their livelihoods (Output 2.4).
  3. Implementing urgent adaptation measures through support to climate change policy processes and development of regulatory and fiscal frameworks at national level. This will include adjusting of budget preparation guidelines issued by Ministry of Finance to include climate change adaptation (Output 3.1); Training of 100 technical staff and managers in 5 relevant ministries to facilitate the investment plan development process (Output 3.2); Development of economic costing of adaptation priorities, based on public expenditure review and gap analysis (Output 3.3); Setting up of support programme for climate change adaptation costing work (Output 3.4); Integration of adaptation costing into a national, multi-sector adaptation investment plan (Output 3.5); Incorporation of adaptation investment priorities into the spending plans in 3 relevant ministries by 2014 (Output 3.6) and; Creation of regulatory and fiscal incentives to stimulate climate risk reduction by the non-government sector identified for three priority sectors (Output 3.7).
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

 

(More Information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Jessica Troni
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

 

(More Information to come)

News and Updates: 

Supporting communities in climate change adaptation activities in Malawi

UNDP
Monday 6 August 2018

It cannot be debated that in Malawi, the livelihood of many people is heavily dependent on rain-fed agriculture. However, in recent years, the adverse impacts of Climate Change have been making the agriculture sector vulnerable. With the prolonged dry spells, seasonal droughts, changes in rainfall patterns and floods characterising the rainy seasons; these climate Change effects have been posing a serious risk to the productivity and profitability of crop farming in the country. To mitigate these challenges, UNDP in Malawi has been working hand in hand with the Government of Malawi to map pathways aimed at building resilient communities and minimize disruptions from climate disasters that affect everyday life and the local economy. The Government of Malawi - through the Ministry of Natural Resources, Energy and Mining, with support from UNDP and the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Countries Fund - is implementing a project in 3 districts namely; Nkata-bay, Zomba and Ntcheu, to support the implementation of adaptation priorities through strengthened, decentralized and national development. The project aims at establishing and then demonstrate the institutional framework required to mainstream climate resilience and adaptation into development planning at local and national levels.

 

Display Photo: 

Community Disaster Risk Management in Burundi

The overarching goal of the project is to safeguard development benefits for vulnerable communities from future climate change induced risks. The community disaster risk management project will enhance local climatic governance by building capacity of key actors and providing necessary risks management tools (e.g. contingency plans, EWS). The project will also promote sustainable and equitable economic growth through the adoption of adaptation-related technologies aiming to rehabilitate and protect vulnerable communities assets

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (29.5971679464 -3.37634010032)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$ 8,715,000

PIFs

Burundi – LDCF Project Identification Form

Co-Financing Total: 
$ 31,300,000
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project is expected to have the following outcomes –

Capacity for disaster risks preparedness is developed through the establishment of early warning systems (Outcome 1.1); At least 50 staff from Bujumbura communal services and relevant ministry support services and about 400 people from vulnerable communities are trained to identify cost‐effective adaptation investments options (Outcome 1.2); Hazard risk maps are developed through livelihoods and infrastructure risk assessment with gender-focused analysis (Outcome 1.3); Policy actions are undertaken such as the revision of Congo-Nile watershed’s hydrological plans (Outcome 1.4) and; Local institutions and community groups are trained in the management and maintenance of tree plantation and anti-erosion (Outcome 1.5).

Effective disaster risk responses are established for long term and climate resilient emergency and reconstruction programme through protection of unstable grounds/ slopes and banks by planting 50,000 ha of specific trees and herbaceous/shrubby quickset hedges in Bugasera (Outcome 2.1); 25 km of anti-erosion small scale infrastructure are installed in Mumirwa (Outcome 2.2) and; Flood control in Bujumbura is established through excavation of 60 km of major river channel (Outcome 2.3).

Contacts: 
UNDP
Mame Diop
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 

Reducing vulnerability of natural resource dependent livelihoods in Boucles du Mouhoun Forest Corridor and Mare d’Oursi Wetlands Basin in Burkina Faso

With more than 70% of the population live on less than $2 per day, Burkina Faso’s economy is heavily dependent on natural resources. In the riparian areas of the Boucles du Mouhoun Forest Corridor (BdM) and the Mare d’Oursi Wetlands Basin (MdO) approximately 150,000 people are directly dependent on natural assets such water, pasture, forests and fertile soil for a living. The project aims to increase the adaptive capacity and reduce vulnerability of the riparian population through timely dissemination of risk information and strengthening of physical, natural and social assets in the two regions. 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-0.922851583844 13.2078604908)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Local communities in the riparian areas of the Boucles du Mouhoun Forest Corridor and the Mare d’Oursi Wetlands Basin
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$7,700,000

PIFs

Burkina Faso - LDCF Project Identification Form

Co-Financing Total: 
$21,407,000
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has three major components with the following expected outcomes –

Component 1 aims at establishing a knowledge support platform on climate change impacts and risks – under this a geo-based climatic, agro-ecological and hydrological information system (Outcome 1.1) will be operational by the end of year 1; approx. 30 national and provincial planners, plus 235 local commune leaders and 50 staff from NGOs/CSOs will be trained on the use and interpretation of analyses from the established information system (Outcome 1.2)

Component 2 deals with the vulnerability reduction and strengthening of resilience in the management of natural and social assets in the project area – this includes cost-effective rewetting and replanting/ protection of indigenous grasses and herbaceous vegetation resilient to significant climatic variance (Outcome 2.1); ensuring flood and erosion control through a “surgical” and climate anticipatory approach (Outcome 2.2); protection of gazetted forests against climate induced bushfire (Outcome 2.3); establishment of an equitable and climate resilient plan for the use of pasture and water resources (Outcome 2.4); demonstration of polyculture and adaptive agro-ecological production systems in communal lands (Outcome 2.5) and; training of local commune leaders and resource users in climate adaptive and anticipatory management of natural and social assets (Outcome 2.6).

Component 3 aims at mainstreaming Climate change adaptation into local and regional development planning and finance. This will be achieved through – integration of climate risk management and climate resilient landscape management into the management (or master) plans of the project area (Outcome 3.1); incorporation of climate resilient poly-culture model into relevant forestry, agricultural and livestock management strategies, plans and investments (Outcome 3.2) and; establishment of wide collaboration frameworks for learning and sharing climate change concerns and options (Outcome 3.3).

Contacts: 
UNDP
Fabiana Issler
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 

Strengthening Liberia's Climate Information and Services to Enhance Climate Resilient Development and Adaptation

This project responds to priorities and actions identified in the Liberia's NAPA which articulate the need for securing, transferring and installing critical technologies, as well as developing the necessary systems for climate change-related information to permeate into decision-making processes. The technologies required to achieve these aims will increase the capacity of the national early warning network to forewarn and rapidly respond to extreme climate events. 

This project is fully in line with LDCF/SCCF focal area objective 2 “Increase adaptive capacity to respond to the impacts of climate change, including variability, at local, national, regional and global level”. Related expected outcomes include strengthening national hydro-meteorological capacities to provide information which can be used to reduce the risk of climate-induced economic losses, as well as increasing the knowledge and understanding of current climate variability and change-induced risks at both the country level and for targeted vulnerable areas. The central goal is to revitalize the main economic sectors of the country, notably agriculture, fisheries and primary industries, in order to contribute to inclusive and sustainable economic development and growth, and to provide food security and nutrition, as well as employment. 

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects in Africa, visit the UNDP-EWS Africa Blog.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-10.7958776844 6.32529240663)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
6,730,000

Project Brief / Fact Sheet

Project Brief: Liberia (August 2015)

Project Brief : Liberia (Oct 2013)

ProDocs

Project Document (Liberia)

Project Preparation Grant (PPG): Africa EWS, August 2012

News article

Liberia: Transport Minister Launches Early Warning System Project

Agenda for EWS workshop Liberia

Communications Products

UNDP-EWS Africa Blog

PIFs

Co-Financing Total: 
28,428,289
Project Details: 

The project complies with the urgent needs identified in the NAPA, all of which are relevant for supporting the national development goals of achieving MDGs 1, 3, 6 and 7. The project is also aligned with the framework of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) I, which calls for sustaining the environment for the present generation and at the same time not compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, and for which the central goal is to revitalize the main economic sectors of the country, notably agriculture, fisheries and primary industries, in order to contribute to inclusive and sustainable economic development and growth, and to provide food security and nutrition, as well as employment. 

The overarching goal of the project is to safeguard hard won gains, resulting from ongoing and planned development efforts, from expected climate change impacts, and especially to reduce the vulnerability of local communities to increasing climate change induced risks. This goal is consistent with, and underpinned by, a number of important policies and strategies governing Liberia's national development and its specific responses to climate change. 

Background

Fourteen years of civil war and decades of low investment in infrastructure have left the Liberian hydro-meteorological services with very little capacity to monitor, forecast, archive, analyse and communicate environmental information related to climate and water, including the impact of extreme climate events and disasters. This situation undermines efforts across a range of sectors to understand, quantify and plan for historical and current climate fluctuations, as well as develop tools to help plan adaptation to future climate changes. This is particularly important given that many of the key economic sectors in Liberia, namely agriculture, fisheries, forestry and energy are highly vulnerable to climate variability and change, yet little is known on how climate is already changing within the region, nor how it may be expected to change in the future.

Efforts to remedy this situation will therefore have positive consequences for the local economy. The proposed project aims to address these deficiencies by implementing the rollout of new infrastructure for monitoring current climate and extremes, as well as building capacity to use this information for communicating climate-related risks, and improve planning and decision-making in key economic sectors.

The Project

The following outlines briefly how climate affects the different sectors (NAPA,2008) and where the proposed project can usefully support climate sensitive short and long-term planning. In line with the NAPA, the proposed project will necessarily provide targeted support to the agriculture sectors. However, it is possible that the scopeed by the sparse observational network. Satellite observations of land use and wildfires have the potential to aid planning and emergency responses (when threatening communities) but are not incorporated into an effective early warning strategy. As forests take several years to mature long term (multi-year to multi- decadal) projections are also useful for long-term planning. However, the available fine resolution climate projections for Liberia are limited by both the observational network and local-regional capacity to generate such scenarios.

Coastal management and fisheries: Over 20,000 workers nationwide earn their livelihoods from fishing activities and fish represent the main source of animal protein in the typical Liberian diet.

  • Lack of data on water temperatures, rainfall, river outflow and coastal ocean dynamics currently limits understanding the vulnerability of fisheries;
  • Changing water temperatures and rainfall patterns may be adversely affecting fish stocks of some species;

Hot nights have increased by 15.7% between 1960 and 2003 and mean annual rainfall has on average decreased since 1960 (http://country-profiles.geog.ox.ac.uk/). It is noteworthy that many aspects of climate change, particularly changes in extremes, were not able to be calculated due to a lack of weather data for the country. Consequently these changes only provide an overview of changes for regions where data was available.

Accurate wind and wave forecasts for the coastal zones are either not available or not routinely communicated to users e.g.... fishing vessels. Whilst there are internationally available wind, wave and temperature forecasts for the globe, these do not account for subtleties of the Liberian coastline so efforts to produce locally applicable forecasts are warranted. The ongoing LDCF financed project “Enhancing Resilience of vulnerable coastal areas to climate change risks in Liberia” includes components to both set up an early warning system for the coast and develop future projections of sea level rise..

Public Health: Changes in rainfall and temperature patterns are expected to lead to increased infections of water-borne diseases e.g.... cholera, dysentery, giardiasis, amebiasis, typhoid fever, and malaria.

  • Malaria is the number one cause of in-patient deaths (42%) and poses the most significant threat to public health, particularly among infants, pregnant mothers and their unborn children.
  • Increases in temperature combined with poor hygienic practices, a scarcity of safe drinking water, limited public health facilities and flooding, will likely increase infection rates.

The predictability of disease outbreaks depend on several climate and non-climatic factors. Of those mentioned above cholera can be monitored/predicted by being related to zooplankton blooms seen in remotely sensed imagery, and malaria is predictable (through monitoring of rainfall and temperature) where it is seasonal in nature. The latter would have direct benefits for the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) and the UNDP GoAL WASH water and sanitation programme would clearly benefit from the former. The introduction of climate forecasts, satellite and climate observation capabilities, will therefore benefit these programmes and the state of public health in Liberia, by forewarning where and when environmental conditions are suitable for disease outbreaks.

Underlying causes

In Liberia the National Meteorological and Hydrological Service (NMHS) were severely disrupted for many years due to civil unrest that caused destruction of meteorological infrastructure, facilities and the loss of important meteorological data and information. As a result, the NMHS does not have the capability of providing the weather and climate information products and services necessary for science-based decision making such as:

  • estimating hazard risks and vulnerabilities for e.g..... floodplain and agricultural land etc;
  • development of an early warning system for droughts, floods and storms;decision making in weather and climate-sensitive economic activities such as agriculture, forestry and construction;
  • coastal zone management, including fisheries;
  • conducting feasibility studies for major developments (e.g.... highways, dams, bridges);
  • analysing climate change risks and developing adaptation strategies.

This project is fully in line with LDCF/SCCF focal area objective 2 “Increase adaptive capacity to respond to the impacts of climate change, including variability, at local, national, regional and global level”. Related expected outcomes include strengthening national hydro-meteorological capacities to provide information which can be used to reduce the risk of climate-induced economic losses, as well as increasing the knowledge and understanding of current climate variability and change-induced risks at both the country level and for targeted vulnerable areas.

Source: Liberia's Project Identification Form (June 19, 2012)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Increased capacity of hydro-meteorological services and associated networks to monitor and predict extreme weather, climate-related hazards and climate trends.

  • Output 1.1: Installation of hydro-meteorological weather and flow gauge stations in critical areas across the country with communications and centralized archiving technologies at the Meteorology Division and Hydrological Service.
  • Output 1.2: Technical capacity of staff in Meteorology Division developed to produce daily to seasonal, seasonal to annual, annual to multi-decadal, climate forecasts, using numerical weather prediction models, seasonal prediction models and internationally produced forecasts
  • Output 1.3: Installation of satellite receivers and other infrastructure (e.g. radar, etc.) for monitoring and assessing the changing state of the environment and the impact of current and future climate on key environmental variables for planning food security, water, and land management.
  • Output 1.4: Staff in Ministry of Land, Mines, and Energy (encompassing Meteorology and Hydrology) trained in the use of climate monitoring equipment, tailored forecasts of climate hazards and use of satellite monitoring for assessing crop production, water resources, wildfires, etc.

Outcome 2: Climate, environmental and socioeconomic data are tailored and combined to produce appropriate information which can be communicated to government entities and communities to enable informed decision making.

  • Output 2.1: Systems and communication with National Disaster Relief Commission are enable to use the forecasts (Output 1.2), environmental monitoring data (Output 1.3), tailored forecasts (Output 1.4), and current vulnerability assessments, to forecast where climate induced risks are high.
  • Output 2.2: Communication channels for issuing warnings (through both governmental and non-governmental agencies) are enabled (e.g. radio, mobile phones, television etc), as well as the procedures and legal basis for the issuing of warnings.
  • Outcome 2.3: Three applications of the early warning system (e.g. coastal, agriculture, floods, health etc) are identified and outputs from 2.1 and 2.2 are tested for their effectiveness.

Outcome 3: Government, private sector and communities are aware of the major risks associated with climate change, and consider them when formulating development policies and strategies

  • Output 3.1: Regional climate change scenarios are developed for Liberia and used to enable identification of ‘hotspots’ where climate change is expected to have high biophysical impacts.
  • Output 3.2: Adaptation options for the most vulnerable communities and livelihoods are made aware to communities in light of projected climate change and current vulnerabilities.
  • Output 3.3: A system for inter-ministerial dialogue on incorporating climate change considerations into government policies is established as well as a mechanism for discussing public and private financing of the EWS system.
  • Output 3.4: Engagement of the private sector to develop paid-for services through the EWS and climate change adaptation options.
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Mark Tadross
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Dominic Sam
Country Officer
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

CBA Viet Nam: Applying Technologies to Address Flash Floods and Drought in Cam Tam Commune

This Community-Based Adaptation project aims to strengthen the preservation and sustainable use of natural resources to reduce impacts of droughts and flash flood on agricultural production at Cam Tam Commune. Cam Tam is a poor commune of the midland mountainous area of Thanh Hoa. It is typical for the region in its of topography, soil conditions, social custom, culture and agricultural practices. Recent environmental degradation and unsustainable resource will be exacerbated by future climate change impacts. In particular, an increase in flash floods and droughts will threaten farms, buildings, livelihoods, and lives.

The project seeks to address these threats by fortifying local ecosystems and water resources through sustainable resource management techniques. Local stakeholders will be trained in land and water conservation practices, then provided with the tools they need to implement them on-the-ground.

This project is part of Viet Nam's Community-Based Adaptation portfolio. *

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((105.42481385 20.2519992209, 105.518197639 20.2468455629, 105.520944221 20.1798324603, 105.427560432 20.1746764116, 105.42481385 20.2519992209))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Mountain Communities; Vulnerable Populations; Farmers
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$50,000
Project Details: 

Cam Tam commune is a midland mountainous commune in the southwestern region of Viet Nam’s Cam Thuy district, Thanh Hoa province. In 2008, the commune was home to 3,451 people, of whom 51.4% were female. The poverty rate is quite high, with 38.1% of residents considered to be poor.

Forested land area in the commune totals 1,126 ha. In the 1960s, Cam Tam housed a large broad-leaved forest, with tropical characteristics and a diversity of species. The forests also used to provide a habitat for many local animal species. There used to be many land snails and land crabs. In particular, ant eggs – a local specialty - were abundant.

In the past 40 years, however, forest resources have been overexploited and destroyed. Losses have been exacerbated the impacts by natural disasters. A decade ago, when local rainfall totaled more than 600mm, Cam Tam observed no flash floods. Nowadays, rainfall events of even 200 mm have given rise to flash floods, resulting in deaths, casualties and property damage. Flash floods have also reduced the amount of land area available for agriculture due to sand and clay deposition.

Additionally, droughts and associated land degradation have negatively affected forest resources. Some plant species have developed soft-stem disease and died off. Many animal species have faced similar plights, with even the local leech populations experiencing a decline.

Local farm and plantation owners have faced their own difficulties. Cam Tam used to accommodate 7 farms, which were recognized as meeting provincial standards. Droughts and water shortages have now brought them hardships and made it difficult to find crop species suited to the changing climate. As a consequence, their land has been reclaimed due to ineffective land use. Areas that have been adversely affected include goat raising pastures and sugar cane plantations.

The impacts of water shortages and flash floods will be greatly exacerbated by climate change, which will consequently affect agriculture production. Rice paddies would be deposited, degraded and eventually abandoned, rice productivity will be unstable and yields will decrease, threatening food security, income sources, and lives.

This Community-Based Adaptation project seeks to develop the community’s adaptive capacity to mitigate these adverse effects by enhancing knowledge and awareness, strengthening sustainable land and water resource management, experimenting with drains to mitigate floods, testing dam possibilities, building a rainwater storage tank, and modeling changes in plantation species composition.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Objective 1: Promote local stakeholders’ awareness and understanding of climate change impacts on local sustainable development.

Enhance related partners’ awareness and understanding of climate change impacts and adaptation options through a leaflet, posters, talks/diaologues, and meetings (Output 1.1).

Objective 2: Build a model to apply scientific-technological advances that limit drought- and flash flood-related damages

Successfully establish a model of protecting and sustainably using water resources through rainwater collection and storage. Assist families with irrigation and daily activities by building (or improving) water-collecting tanks, holding technical workshops, establishing a water efficiency group with the participation of 10-15 households, and preparing technical documents for dissemination (Output 2.1). Successfully establish a sustainable land resources and biodiversity model by establishing 20 ha of rice cultivation land with drought-resistant varieties and crop rotation, holding training workshops, establishing a user group, preparing technical documents on drought-resistant cultivation measures, and experimenting with drains to limit the effects of flash floods (Output 2.2).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The Vulnerability Reduction Assessment (VRA) will be measured at the planning stage of the project, at the mid-point, and at the end of project. Given that the VRA is qualitative and is based on the community perceptions, the first VRA was conducted to establish a baseline during the Project planning phase. A second VRA will be done at mid project after all the project activities to build the model has been completed. A final VRA will be done at the end of the project to assess the overall impact of the project on the community adaptive capacity.

The VRA questions that will be used are as follows:

1. Rate the impact of droughts, flash flood and land degradation on your livelihood

2. Rate your ability to cope with the negative impacts of droughts, flash flood and land degradation

3. Rate the impact on your livelihood if droughts, flash flood and land degradation doubles

4. Rate how effectively you would be able to cope with the doubling of droughts, flash flood and land degradation

5. Rate how effective you think this project will be in reducing your risks from increasing droughts, flash flood and land degradation.

6. Rate your confidence that the project will continue to reduce droughts, flash flood and land degradation risks after the project ends.

7. Rate your own ability to cope with increasing droughts, flash flood and land degradation and other climate changes after this project ends.

Global Environmental Benefits (GEBs)

The Impact Assessment System (IAS) indicator will be measured at the end of the project using the following components:

  1. The number of hectares of land protected from degradation due to droughts and flash flood
  2. The number of innovations developed/applied under the project
  3. The number of policy recommendations proposed in disaster, land and ago biodiversity management

The targets for the above are as follows:

  1. Twenty hectares will be sustainable managed by the project
  2. The project will apply 3 technologies (namely, drought tolerant and local rice varieties and cultivation, rainwater harvesting, flash flood control)
  3. Three to four recommendation on policies in disaster, land and ago biodiversity management will be proposed to local authorities
  4. Availability of information and data on CC impact in Cam Tam Commune

UNDP Adaptation Indicators

The project will contribute to the UNDP adaptation indicators adopted by the Viet Nam CBA country programme strategy, namely:

  1. The number of measures that address the additional risks posed by climate change deployed as part of sustainable resource management activities;
  2. Percentage of area concern in which climate change risk management activities, in the context of sustainable resource management are implemented; and
  3. Number of local and national level policy recommendations proposed as a result of lessons from CBA projects

The targets for the UNDP Adaptation indicators are outlined below:

  1. Three measures will be deployed as part of the activities for sustainable farming in the project area.
  2. Twenty hectares of land sustainbaly used.
  3. Three to four policy recommendations proposed as a result of lessons from the project.
Contacts: 
UNDP
CBA Project Management Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SPA
Project Status: 

CBA Samoa: Adaptation to Flooding and Sea Level Rise - Fagamalo

Fagamalo village was once the government centre for the north of Savaii, with the district hospital, district secondary school, government offices, and businesses all located here. But cyclones Ofa and Val in the early 1990's totally destroyed all of the government infrastructure and businesses, and decimated most of the village residences along the shore. Approximately 50 meters of the coastline have been eroded by cyclones and subsequent strong wave surges. While several families have relocated inland, the majority of the villagers still reside on the coast due to the convenient access to the ecosystem they rely on for their livelihoods.

This Community-Based Adaptation project reduces the impacts of cyclones and flooding on households, the wetland, and coastal ecosystems around Fagamalo by taking out the existing rock jetty that has contributed to rapid coastal erosion. The project also supports the coral regrowth in the inshore reef. To diminish flooding risks, the existing access road will be upgraded. The upgraded, unsealed access roads will also provide easy access to higher grounds during natural disasters such as tsunamis, cyclones, and strong wave surges. On normal days when cyclones are not a threat, the upgraded roads will reduce land-based pollution from affecting the wetlands.

* This project is part of UNDP's "Community-Based Adaptation" portfolio. *

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((-172.358481588 -13.4420264659, -172.346808614 -13.4420264659, -172.339598836 -13.4488716799, -172.360713186 -13.4467012674, -172.358481588 -13.4420264659))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Coastal Communities
Funding Source: 

TOFIGA O PILI AAU - Samoa CBA Project (Pt. 2)

 

This is a shortened version of an original 25-minute video created through a participatory process at the sites of UNDP's Community-Based Adaptation projects in Samoa. It features the initiatives of vulnerable communities as they act to mitigate the impacts of climate chaneg on their environment, livelihoods and infrastructure.

TOFIGA O PILI AAU - Samoa CBA Project (Pt. 1)

This is a shortened version of an original 25-minute video created through a participatory process at the sites of UNDP's Community-Based Adaptation projects in Samoa. It features the initiatives of vulnerable communities as they act to mitigate the impacts of climate chaneg on their environment, livelihoods and infrastructure.

Brochures, Posters, Communications Products

CBA Samoa - Photo Story

PIFs

CBA Samoa - Fagamalo - Project Proposal (EN)

Financing Amount: 
$25,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$6,000
Project Details: 

Samoa is an archipelago in the South Pacific, consisting of two large mountainous islands, Upolu and Savai’I, and seven other small islands. The majority of Samoan people live within one kilometer of the coast leaving them highly vulnerable to climate change hazards such flooding and sea level rise. This holds true for Fagamalo village, which is located in the northern most point of the island of Savai’i. This site is home to threatened ecosystems including coral reefs, mangroves and mixed herbaceous coastal marsh. The marine biodiversity includes over 40 coral species and 60 fish and marine invertebrates.

Fagamalo’s 700 residents depend largely on plantations and fishing for their livelihoods. The village fronts the sea with the outer reef break approximately 200 meters from the beach. Due to its proximity to the coast, Fagamalo and its wetlands are vulnerable to climate variability and extreme weather patterns that can result in coastal erosion and flooding. Cyclones, like those of the 1990’s, can cause damage to critical ecosystems, agricultural crops, livestock and homes leaving areas unsafe for permanent habitation.

Climate change projections for Samoa predict an increase in average temperatures, a decrease in total precipitation, more high intensity rainfall events, a rise in sea level, and a perceived increase in the severity of tropical cyclones. During the rainy season, coastal erosion and flooding events have adversely impacted the project area. Beginning in the early 1990’s, climate change started being felt in this part of the country. The village is now facing rapid coastal erosion driven by increasing storm intensity and declining resilience of buffering coral ecosystems and littoral plants. As a result, homes that used to be located farther from the sea are now closer to the coast. In addition to coastal erosion, erratic and heavy rainfall results in the flooding of over 70% of the village area, damaging homes, crops, livestock and roads. Faced with heightened climate change risks, residents who rely upon natural ecosystems will find it increasingly difficult to sustain their livelihoods.

This Community-Based Adaptation project seeks to reduce the vulnerability of Fagamalo village and its surrounding ecosystems to adverse impacts of climate change in general, and to flooding and coastal erosion in particular. The project emerged from the Samoan Government’s Coastal Infrastructure Management (CIM) planning initiative. It was prepared through a participatory process involving all segments of the community.

The project is designed to increase the adaptive capacity of the community to climate change through a variety of activities. The current walking path will be upgraded to an unsealed access road in order to expedite upland evacuation when cyclones, high waves and flooding affect the village. This will also act as a natural barrier to wetland flooding while reducing pollution by stopping the dumping of rubbish behind homes. The existing rock jetty will be removed to allow for the natural flow of sand and inshore currents, thus reducing coastal erosion and associated effects on the coral reef.

The project also contains an awareness-raising programme to help community members better understand climate change and its associated risks and impacts. Altogether, these activities provide the village with human and infrastructure capacities necessary to increase the resilience of the ecosystems and households to climate change variability.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1.0: Increased coastal ecosystems resilience in face of climate change impacts

Upgrade access road (Output 1.1), remove rock jetty (Output 1.2), and replant coastal ecosystems (Output 1.3).

Outcome 2.0: Developed community capacity to manage resilient local ecosystems

Implement awareness-raising programme (Output 2.1) and wetland pollution prevention programme (Output 2.2).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The assessment on the impacts of climate change on the communities started in the development of the CIM Plans in 2007. In these consultations, all sectors of the community were provided with maps of the area, whereby affected areas from climate changed were identified and visited. These consultations identified cyclones, flooding, and coastal erosion as the main climate risks and were seen as extremely damaging noting that the majority of the old village was destroyed. In between the cyclones, the village identified flooding as the most regular climate risk issue where the inland road to the new homes mostly get blocked, while the stream overflows onto the road, the church and remaining homes along the coast.

The VRA analysis was process undertaken with the village over the last two years, attended by all sectors of the village but in several instances, by mixed group of participants. In the last workshop held on May 14th 2009, the village reiterated that rather than again going through the process, they supported all the issues raised in previous consultations.

In identifying possible options to reduce the climate risks, the village using information already gathered from the CIM Plan, and the VRA process, identified flooding, cyclones and coastal erosion as the main climate risks. The impacts of flooding, cyclones and strong wave surges were identified as safety of people, agricultural crops, livestock, and homes. Environmentally, it was also recognized that the climate risks also impact on the critical ecosystems such as coral reefs, and the wetlands that provide ptertinent ecological services that support human.

To reduce the vulnerability to cyclones, flooding and coastal erosion, the main activities agreed upon were the upgrading of the access road so families could easily access the uplands when cyclones, high waves and flooding affect village. This actions was also seen as a way of protecting the wetlands and biodiversity from continued pollution from household activities, waste disposal and feral pigs.

To reduce the vulnerability on the increasing sea level rise, the village agreed to take out the existing rock jetty to allow for the natural flow of sand and inshore currents, thus reducing coastal erosion.

Other issues identified in the CIM Plan as impacts of climate change included the lack of water supply within the village and district, especially for families that have moved inland from the coast. The new project for the district for upgrading its water supply network has been approved for funding by the European Union. The maintenance of existing public roads along the village has now been taken up by the MWTI.

Contacts: 
UNDP
CBA Project Management Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SPA
Project Status: 
Display Photo: